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Should contraceptives (birth control) be free and accessible to teenagers without parental consent?

Asked by: doeanony
  • Contraceptives should be readily available

    This is a public health measure.

    Simply by denying the fact our teenagers aren't sexually active doesn't mean it is true. So here are the alternatives and consequences:

    -we bury our heads in the sand-->
    1. Consequences of unwanted pregnancies, abortion
    2. Or kids raising kids (and these teenage girls then having to drop out of school, which leads to a cycle of lifelong POVERTY)
    3. Worsening rate of sexually transmitted dx incl Chlamydia (can lead to infant blindness, pneumonia and death), Gonorrhea (can lead to joint destruction and septic arthritis as well as severe abdominal consequences from intra abdominal spread) and AIDS
    4. Teenage girls making uninformed decisions on sex, and being unable to responsible adults if they are assaulted or raped (because "they weren't supposed to have sex anyway")
    5. Shame, self image and body issues because they are taught that sex in a loving manner is "wrong"

  • It has been proven to work.

    If teenagers have to get parental consent to use a form of birth control, they are less likely to seek out those options since sex is something they wouldn't want to discuss with their parents. By increasing access to birth control and making them free, we can easily decrease the amount of abortions and unplanned pregnancies.

  • Obviously it should be

    It would greatly improve the country and the people. I agree with what user doeanony said "It has been proven to work. If teenagers have to get parental consent to use a form of birth control, they are less likely to seek out those options since sex is something they wouldn't want to discuss with their parents. By increasing access to birth control and making them free, we can easily decrease the amount of abortions and unplanned pregnancies."

  • Teenagers shouldn't be having sex in the first place...

    The rules are there for a reason, and you have to follow them whether you like them or not. Teenagers shouldn't be having sex, end of story. It's against the law, and those laws are there for a reason, and if they won't follow those rules than they just have to learn the hard way.

  • No they shouldn't.

    Even though several states and municipalities already provide this accommodation, I think it just undermines a parent's ability to... Be a parent. Contraceptives are not health "treatments" like some arguers would have you believe, and they are not necessarily "preventative" either, since preventative health measures are typically taken so that you can protect yourself from unexpected potential health risks. Contraceptives are sought out in response to intentionally do something that has very clear and imminent consequences. It's probably very very rare that a girl seeks out a condom thinking "hm, just in case I get raped tonight." Generally teenagers seek out contraceptives because they are specifically intending to engage in sexual activities. I think it's very backwards to exclude the parents from these life altering decisions that their children are making rather than inform them about them.

    Would you feel any better about the government issuing out clean syringes to your children without your knowledge so that they could dope up without the fear of bloodborne diseases?

    Or providing your kids with zinc supplements so that your kids can combat the harmful effects of alcohol and consume more?

    Or maybe they should give your kids helmets so that your 5 your old kids can ride motorcycles around all day without you knowing about it.


    Parents should NEVER be left out of the loop on something that could potentially hurt the safety or welfare of their child.

  • Teenagers are presumed to be unable to make informed decisions on sex independently and thus should not be given the unregulated consent on contraceptive use.

    By making birth control accessible to teenagers at the ignorance of their parents, we are giving teenagers the consent to have sex. However, at the young age, teenagers do not know enough of the consequences of succumbing to the nature of being sexually active and have casual sex. Thus, they need guidance and adults who are generally more knowledgeable should be able to offer advice and warnings. For example, adolescents should be aware the risk of acquiring sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) from sexual partners and contraceptives are not the impregnable guard against being infected with the human immunodeficient virus (HIV), gonorrhea, just to name a few, thus allowing teenagers to make more informed decisions. With the lack of experience, teenagers should not be trusted with the dangers of casual sex in the form of unwanted pregnancies and STDs and ought to seek parental advice and hence the need for consent.


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