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  • All Probable Theories should be presented

    Both evolution and creationism are probable causes for our universe. Some may argue that one is more probable than the other. I believe that they both should be taken into consideration and compared and contrasted. Contrary to popular belief there is evidence for creationism. There is also some, but not as much evidence for evolution.Http://www.Experts123.Com/q/do-any-evolutionists-admit-that-the-fossil-record-does-not-match-darwinian-predictions.Html Fossils are not nearly as abundant as said. Even Darwin said that the lack of fossils is a big issue against his theories.

    Oh well whether or not evolution or creationism is true is another issue. Both sides should be taught with actual facts stated.

  • We don't know still what is true.

    This could be the way for new ideas. Sure, there's evidence to back up Darwin's claims, however where is the proof of HOW WE EVOLVED SO DIFFERENT FROM OTHERS? As with others above, I agree that it should be based on what the Student thinks. Possibly, we might even discover our true origins.

  • Should creation be taught in schools? Certainly.

    The main probable theories of science and creation should be presented. At least in an overview-type scenario. To give credence to one particular theory is certainly biased. Though, to be fair, I do not think either scenario should be cast as actual fact from the school's point of view simply because there is no way to prove either and no one has. Believing in creation is a personal, logical choice which the individual must come to themselves. It is not meant to be drilled into their heads indoctrination-style. I see the same for evolution and the big bang/creation from nothing scenario.

    I also do think that if they are going to lean towards creation from nothing/evolution, they must teach the implications of such beliefs, that all life and the universe is meaningless, and there is no ultimate, objective, moral right, and thus, there is no reason to believe violence is wrong, atrocities are wrong, etc. To say these examples are wrong is to have an unjustified/unjustifiable belief, which is based on sentiment.

  • Students should at least go into a little detail about it so that they know about it.

    Yes I think that creationism should be taught in school that the students will know about it and if they were to have a debate or something in class they will know about it, and can be able to talk about It with out looking like they know nothing about the subject. So I think that public schools should teach creationism in class.

  • Of course it should

    Creationism is just as likely as any other theory that scientists have. All viable theories should be taught. What is more the vast majority of people in western countries are Christian, the vast majority feel very strongly that God created the Earth. It should be taught in schools for sure.

  • Yes, depending on what the student wants to learn

    Evolution, although a commonly accepted idea is still a theory, either the government must accept this 'theory as fact and change it to a definitive term or promote other more appropriate beliefs on the origin of the earth. The big band, the corner stone of evolution, does not have much basis. Not to mention the holey fabric of gradual shift of species, e.G. One species eventually becomes another etc.

  • Children should be taught creationism

    But not as the one definitive proof. Children need to be taught about ALL possibilities so that they can make their own decisions rather than being told whether one theory is right, however, teaching JUST about creationism would, again, not give them the full picture. There is no reason why creationism should not be taught, whether the children agree with it or not.

  • No, that would be unconstitutional.

    Our country was founded on freedom of religion, and it is "religion" to teach creationism in public schools. People are entitled to their own beliefs, or to have no religious beliefs at all, and it would not only be unconstitutional, but impossible to come to some agreement on how creationism would be taught. Absolutely not! Religion and education should not be mixed!

  • Not thoroughly, no

    I believe that an overview of creationism should be given when lessons on evolution are being taught, but not as something that is factual in any way. Teaching creationism in detail and as something definite will only open schools up to drama between parents and teachers and in the classroom between students with differing views. If it were to be taught, I think parents should absolutely be allowed to have their child not attend that lesson if they wish it, however.

  • I can't even

    Begin to believe how these idiotic drooling half wits are given any credence in modern society , I have said it before why it this ridiculous nonsense only tolerated in mainly the USA?
    If you presented there absolutely barking mad ideas to a class of 10 year olds in my country ( Ireland) you would be deafened by riotous laughing that would ensue .
    I was asked earlier " can stupidity be passed on through generations " well you guys over there can see first hand it certainly can .... Creationists children

  • Creationism should only be taught in a Religion class objectively. Otherwise, it would be unconstitutional.

    There is a reason we have separated church from state. Everyone should have the freedom to believe what they wish to believe. If creationism were taught in a science class, many would have a huge problem with that. If it were taught objectively in a class on religion, however, that would be more acceptable. Children should grow to believe in the religion they choose, not a religion that a school teaches them. There are many different religions in America, not just Christianity. If you wish to teach Christianity, teach the other religions as well.

  • Not thoroughly, no

    I believe that an overview of creationism should be given when lessons on evolution are being taught, but not as something that is factual in any way. Teaching creationism in detail and as something definite will only open schools up to drama between parents and teachers and in the classroom between students with differing views. If it were to be taught, I think parents should absolutely be allowed to have their child not attend that lesson if they wish it, however.

  • No, that would be unconstitutional.

    Our country was founded on freedom of religion, and it is "religion" to teach creationism in public schools. People are entitled to their own beliefs, or to have no religious beliefs at all, and it would not only be unconstitutional, but impossible to come to some agreement on how creationism would be taught. Absolutely not! Religion and education should not be mixed!


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