• Yes, cursive should continue to be taught in schools.

    Some schools are doing away with cursive instruction because it takes so long, and people are typing so much nowadays. However, this seems short sighted. Cursive is still needed for things such as signing checks and contracts. It's easier to write in cursive than to print. Some experts are even saying cursive helps in brain development. As someone who had to teach myself cursive, I can say that it was very difficult; I made and still make letters improperly, and would have greatly benefited from learning it in school.

  • Still essential

    Cursive is one of those things that seems obsolete, but, in actuality, still has a great deal of need in society. For one, to properly sign one's name requires cursive, and one's signature is essential to the whole idea of contracts and business deals. In addition, many older people still write in cursive, and not being able to read it would put younger people at a great disadvantage. Perhaps the system could be slowly reformed, but simply abolishing it is not the answer.

  • Let's Keep Our Etiquette to Some Standard

    Cursive should forever be taught in elementary schools. Cursive is a beautiful way to script the English language. With slang becoming so popular, even being added to dictionaries, cursive is the one subject that need not be taken away. Elementary schools should keep this standard of etiquette for young minds who absorb all new information. On a lighter note, without cursive, what would Doctors do?

  • Cursive is stimulating.

    Cursive is a stimulating and elegant way of writing. It helps the mind focus and is pretty good for children at a younger age to take the time to learn it. Especially for developmental minds. It also teaches a level of class and a strive to be better at something. My private school would only allow all work to be done in cursive else it was not to be turned in. We maintained some of the highest scores in our city.

  • There is absolutely no use for it other than a signature.

    In elementary school they teach us that we will need it later in life, to this day the only thing I have ever written in cursive after learning it in the first grade is my signature. Which doesn't even necessary have to be cursive just the first initial then squidgy lines after it. Also after the fact that I learned it back then it completely slipped my mind on how to do most letters, via the ones that are not in my name. Therefore unless you would like to learn this it is complete junk useless information that doesn't even stick through to many people unless they actually like it. I mean it takes time away from actually important things, As in time away from fundamentals of math, science, history. They could of put in exercise time in place or even focused in on the more important areas of language arts. I mean come on now this answer is obviously NO. It is not necessary to move forward in life. I mainly only use computers and cells technology these days, They have computer schools that are becoming way more advanced. All those texts usually require Arial black. Also with the lack of decent handwriting skills many people have, cursive I've actually witnessed makes it worse. My mother always written cards and stories she kept to herself in cursive I seen a few and could barely make out the words. My grandmother I don't want to speak bad of her, But every single birthday card I received from her and tried to read, I could barely make out the words it would of been simpler if it was just in regular print. Point proven.

  • No, cursive is basically outdated

    I don't believe cursive should necessarily be taught in elementary school because it is basically an outdated practice. Perhaps, it should be covered briefly, but I feel time would be much better spent teaching children how to think for themselves, teaching a well-rounded curriculum and teaching kids about technology and how to use it.

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Anonymous says2013-02-22T20:21:25.380
No, we shouldn't have to be taught cursive in schools.