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  • Yes, it is

    People who see no problem with declawing cats call us out for "exaggerating". Fine. Lets say that declawing has absolutely no side-effects and is virtually painless. This justifies it, doesn't it? No. It does not. Imagine you have a problem with scratching strangers with your nails. Your parents get mad, take you to the doctor, and he amputates the first joint off every single one of your fingers. He does it nicely, you feel normal afterwards, but wait...Your fingers are gone! Declawing isn't a manicure for your cat, or a "choice" you can make to "customize" your pet to make him or her more desirable. Declawing is a ridiculous matter of convenience that leaves your pet cat mutilated. People need to realize that having a cat is a huge commitment, like adopting a child, and it you are not ready to handle the things that may come with getting a cat, you should just not get a cat at all. You may seem to think that declawing your cat is simply an easy procedure that serves as a quick fix to all of your problems, but it is not. Declawing mutilates your pet, and it proves that you, as a pet owner, are lazy and does not deserve the companionship of a cat.

  • Yes. Declawing of cats should be illegal in all parts of the world.

    Declawing is more than just a simple clipping of a toenail, as with our feet, it is an actual amputation of the last bone in the cats foot which can leave the cat crippled. When the bone is removed the tendons are also cut, which makes the cat unable to walk naturally. Instead they end up walking on their elbows or wrists instead of their feet. This is a serious procedure, and I would never, put a cat through it unless its life was threatened.

  • Cats will never mentally recover.

    Cats will never get over that! Declawing a cat is the equivalent of cutting off your fingers at least to the first knuckle. Their behavior will completely change because they know something is missing. It also causes them pain. Cats usually scratch, I get that, but you have no right to cut off their only line of defense.

  • It is unatural

    Declawing of cats, is done solely for the purpose of the owner. It is not beneficial to the animal, if you are unwilling to deal with an animal's behavior perhaps that animal is not for you.

    Reiterating the point others have made, cats have a variety of uses for their claws, hence evolution favoring that trait. Removing the claws therefore removes innate abilities, and behaviors.

  • It's sort of inhumane, and removes a tool cats use for lots of everyday tasks.

    First off, a cat's claw is similar to the last third of your finger, including the nail and joint. Would we not consider it inhumane to remove the last third of criminal's fingers to prevent them being as capable of harming others/stealing things so easily? Never mind the fact that this would also remove a lot of mundane utility such as grasping ability and fine hand dexterity, it's also cruel and unusual treatment, and totally inhumane.

    A cat uses their claws to defend themselves against threats, which even a totally domesticated house cat may still face, to climb large objects and to maneuver smaller objects. In taking away the cat's claw, you are removing a lot of it's basic ability to control it's own movement and be safe and secure in it's own home. As well, just as if a human had their last third of their fingers/toes removed, a cat that has been declawed will show physical and psychological problems from this mutilation, that was done without their consent.
    True, cat's logically cannot give consent, but so what? They aren't simply objects, they are still sentient animals even if they aren't on the same mental and psychological level as humans are.

  • Can make cats vulnerable to harm and danger

    Cats cannot give consent to this. And if outdoor cats get declawed to not scratch at furniture etc inside than they are being removed of something they use to hunt and protect themselves from attack and danger. Cat claws serve an evolutionary purpose, even a lot of indoor cats need them to climb and perform everyday cat tasks

  • It is inhumane.

    Declawing a cat is like cutting off someone's fingertips and toes. I think what a lot of people don't understand is that this is a serious, painful surgery. Cats are not afforded the luxury that are provided to humans after a surgery, such as using a bed pan instead of walking to and from the bathroom. After a declawing, cats must walk to walk to their litter box, food bowl, etc. In addition to this, there are many long-term psychological and behavioral issues that occur as a result of this surgery. If anyone is interested, there's a petition on We the People to put an end to declawing: http://wh.Gov/lDrix

  • Declawing is inhumane, unnecessary, and completely greedy.

    28 other countries have banned declawing for a reason. It's not about your convenience or your couch looking all beautiful, it's about your cat's well being. Plus, there's this magical tool called a SCRATCHING POST that is readily available at your local pet store. Cats scratch for exercise and to shed the sheath on their claws. It is also a defense mechanism. If your cat scratches you, it's not because they don't like you, it's probably because you the cat guardian did something wrong and the cat saw you as a threat. If you remove the claws, then the cat will bite. Biting has a MUCH greater chance of giving you a disease than scratching does. If you do get scratched, you should clean the would thoroughly and you won't get sick. Simple. Cleaning a bite wound isn't so simple. A lot of people argue that spaying/neutering is much more invasive. However, when you fix your cat you are doing it for his/her sake. When you declaw, you're doing it for your own convenience.

  • Cats are domesticated

    The reason cats need claws is for survival in nature. House cats are removed from nature and thus do not need claws in order to survive. Declawing cats is to prevent them from scratching other people or tearing up fernature. There's no reason why the owner shouldn't be alowed to make the choice in regards to declawing. Cats will still have a healthy happy life either way.

  • We declaw cats for a reason.

    The practice of removing the claws from a domestic cat is, at least in part, due to the destructive nature of a cat's claws. Cats are known to tear at the furniture, ruining it, and causing dozens to hundreds of dollars to damage to the upholstery. Declawing a cat will allow it to continue to do the same actions that it did before hand, without causing any damage to upholstery.

  • NO! There is no need and it is torture.

    You are sitting at home realizing your new adoptive parents are loving and kind. They feed you, play with you, love you....You are beginning to feel safe in your new home. The next day they take you in that funny box to that lady in the white coat and you feel a pinch, you get sleepy and zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz. You wake up and your front paws ache. For a few days your paws ache and you don't feel so good, but eventually your humans make better. One night you start to play, but you can't hold on to anything, WHERE ARE MY CLAWS? You personality changes, I am frightened, betrayed... I have to get out! Finally one day, one of the younger humans leaves the door open, I run and run and run. Later that night I see another one of me. I approach and he attacks scratching me over and over again, but I cannot defend myself. I wake up days later at that place where the lady in the white coat is. She comes by to rub my head and I close my eyes the last time. Imagine if Kitty had ripped all your nails off and then shot you in the head. Would you love it then? Animals are NOT our property, we co exist with them,

  • There are too many considerations. It should be between vet and owner.

    There are many instances when declawing might be preferred or even necessary to keep a cat in a home:

    - In some people with cat allergies, scratches exacerbate allergic reactions. My husband is one such person. We currently have three cats, all of whom are declawed; one who especially likes to play rough who also happens to be his little buddy. If declawing became illegal, I'm not sure we'd be able to rescue cats the way we do now.

    - I had one cat who was recommended we declaw him not for medical reasons, necessarily, but because he was playful and would get stuck in places when he was a kitten. We went away for a couple of nights and came home to find him stuck to the dishwasher. No idea how long he was there for, without access to food, water or his litter box. It was for his own safety we had him declawed. He lived 17 wonderful years.

    - Another cat we adopted, the vet recommended declawing due to our resident cat becoming very ill shortly after the new-comer came into our home. They warned us that a scratch to the resident cat's eye could cause a life-threatening infection due to his current state of health. I had that resident cat for 8 years and couldn't think of losing him. Would it have been better to take the kitten back? (That kitten is now a very loved and spoiled 6-year old cat who doesn't seem the least bothered by his not having claws. He still dominates the other cats in the house with his gigantic stature.)

    - Cats use their back claws for defense. Their front claws are for hunting. An indoor cat has no need for hunting claws. An outdoor cat should not be declawed. No cat should have his back claws removed unless there is some serious medical reason for it. This is why it should be between the vet and the owner, not the law.

    - A procedure and recovery done correctly should not be a problem in the future. I know people try to claim that they are in discomfort and they just hide it well, but those people are incorrect. There have been times when my cats WERE in pain or unwell, and, yes, they do try to hide it, but I've always been able to recognize the signs and get them medical attention.

    I understand the reaction against declawing, however, I think people need to look at the whole picture and consider all the possibilities before outright banning this procedure. The road to hell is paved with good intentions, after all.

  • Choose carefully your vet and there are new improved procrdures

    I believe we have choices as pet owners if we can declaw or not, however, it only seems necessary and humane for 2 declaws not 4. If owners are worried about getting scratched and with younger children in the house they would only need the front paws. When veterinarians used to do the declaws they could break or remove the T3 bone, which could leave tiny fragments of bones and cause more pain. With the new laser surgery there is less bleeding, less nerve damage, and less pain. Picking the right vet is important, you should see how they will care for your pet and what kind of pain management they offer post-surgery. The best time to declaw is before the age of 5 months, kittens are still learning about themselves and will have a less negative impact emotionally. If it's done in older cats just remember to ask to have a consultation with your doctor to make sure there are not any other options you have not tried yet.

  • The truth is not as bad as they say!

    Undeclawed Cat:
    You arrive at your new home. They feed you, pet you, and love you. But then, as instincts tell you, you destroy the new couch with your claws. They are forced to keep you in the basement, and you may have even been given away if you harm someone with your claws. They do this because, apparently, it is the most humane thing to do.
    Declawed Cat:
    You arrive at your new home. They feed you, pet you, and love you. You scratch the couch. They are upset, and when you reach a certain age, they take you to be declawed. The surgery is done by a kind and experienced vet, and even though your paws may be sore, atleast you get to stay with your family. You didn't need that last one anyways. It is not used to walk on, and it's only purpose was defense for survival. But your an indoor cat, so no need to worry!


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