Amazon.com Widgets

Should fashion models be required to maintain a certain weight to help promote positive body image and health?

Asked by: miny1020
  • Uiooijoi uniu njb

    Jbjbjjbjbbjb djasx sjxjs sjxjs xsj xja xajxhasx shjx ja xjs js jb jsdh s ukhC CHJS DS JSD JSJ AS JX AH Hewuj sus jsu uyw s cus uds isi cs is isa au uhdsu sus us us uv u d xzn sdj dsj b sbx nb znbnjasjsa jdsh ddsc jas cas mnsa

  • Healthy, not just skinny.

    Fashion models sell more than clothes, they sell a lifestyle. When they show an unhealthy one, the target demographic internalizes it as a "model" lifestyle. It needs to be an enforced industry standard that models, no matter who they're wearing, promote and sell a healthy lifestyle as the kind to model.

  • Yes, fashion models should maintain a certain weight.

    I do think weight should be regulated so that models don't become ill and develop eating disorders. However, I don't see a reason for a limit on the other end unless they are morbidly obese. We need to teach girls with low self-esteem to love their healthy weights, and the best way to do so is to have regular looking humans on the runway. Not that anyone could ever define "regular" by how someone looks. I define regular by how physically healthy they are.

  • Speaking as an 18 year old girl...definitely!

    Young girls idolize models, and look up to them as a thing of beauty. And as young girls, they themselves strive to be beautiful. They are already going through so much trauma, as they become young women, constantly criticizing themselves and comparing themselves. They should be shown that there is more to being super skinny, and that having some padding is natural and healthy!

  • Bring individuality back!

    In society today, young people have a mindset where huge emphasis is placed on how others perceive them. In order to be perceived in a positive light, they emulate people that others admire. Their "role models". For girls, the people they aspire to be like are the fashion models. When near enough every fashion model in size two it sends out the wrong message, a message that tells these girls in order to be beautiful you have to be stick thin. As well as damaging individuality if 90% of girls look the same, the health implications of young girls starving themselves to look like these models are alarming. Some people naturally have different builds, and if some girls deprive themselves of key nutrients to get down to these stick-thin sizes then we need to look at eradicating this image of "you have to be size two to be beautiful".

  • We need to start promoting healthy body types.

    It's not about promoting sexy appearances... It's about promoting healthy bodies. Of course this comes with a keeping in mind you need to teach young audiences the appropriate way to maintain a healthy body. Models shouldn't be anorexic, by no means, but they shouldn't be fat. We can NOT promote obesity and unhealthy life styles. If our models and the people we idolize start including over-weight women, we start to accept obesity as being ok, and it's not. While we should accept the people, the obesity part we should not.

  • Models are under a lot of pressure

    I believe fashion models are under a lot of pressure to stay thin and look beautiful. Models don't make it to magazine covers and runway shows because of their brains and talent, it's because they look good and make the clothes or whatever the designer is selling look good. Through research and talking to people in the industry I think a lot of these models are under pressure to look beautiful and thin and will sometimes go to drastic and unhealthy means to maintain their image. Not only are they jeopardizing their health but I think the image they portray can be a negative influence on young girls who want to look as beautiful and slim as the models. What these young girls don't realize is that models themselves don't even look like the magazine covers. By models having to maintain a certain weight or BMI, it puts pressure on the industry to take responsibility for the models health and well being and promoting a more positive body image.

  • Its just stupid

    Not everyone has the perfect body so why advertise it like that? They should advertise what regular people actually look like. When someone trys on something and there not as skinny as the person in the picture its disapointing and can bring down someones self-asteem. If they advertise real people it would work. I understand people are naturally skinny but if they aren't it makes them sad. They should advertise both weights.

  • Don't regulate the fashion industry, instead simply use plus-size models

    There are many attractive plus-size women, who know how to wear clothes and walk down a runway. These should be promoted instead of regulating the fashion industry. Sex sells, and skinny sells to women, which is beneficial to the economy. Even though there are connections to eating disorders, it's more important to support the economy.

  • No, be happy the way you are.

    It doesn't matter what a person looks like fat or skinny, tall or short as long as your healthy and happy with yourself. Maintain your health and exercise in a way to keep your heart health not how you want your body to look. Be proud and feel beautiful about yourself!

  • I don’t that models should be forced to be a certain weight.

    NO! I don’t that models should be forced to be a certain weight. I feel as though the problem is not the weight of the model, but simply the promotion of one over the next, such as super-models and plus sized models. Requiring models to make a specific weight could be effective, but petty at the same time, since it would not be targeting the core of the problem. Personally, I see skinny women who look healthy and on the other hand I see some that look extremely sick. But I also see plus size models that are too heavy and then some that look very attractive. My point is, some individuals prefer and are naturally skinny or small boned and then, some are simply heavier. Since skinny models are pushed in the public’s faces more than any other, is why we have women trying to loose so much weight. Equal the playing field and stop downgrading one over the next, then women will be more proud of their natural weight.

  • I don’t think that models should be forced to be a certain weight.

    NO! I don’t think that models should be forced to be a certain weight. I feel as though the problem is not the weight of the model, but simply the promotion of one over the next, such as super-models and plus sized models. Requiring models to make a specific weight could be effective, but petty at the same time, since it would not be targeting the core of the problem. Personally, I see skinny women who look healthy and on the other hand I see some that look extremely sick. But I also see plus size models that are too heavy and then some that look very attractive. My point is, some individuals prefer and are naturally skinny or small boned and then, some are simply heavier. Since skinny models are pushed in the public’s faces more than any other, is why we have women trying to loose so much weight. Equal the playing field and stop downgrading one over the next, then women will be more proud of their natural weight.

  • I do not feel that models should maintain a certain weight.

    I feel this way because the fact is every woman and man has a different body makeup so no one minimum weight will work for every person. This idea sounds nice but it isn't possible since every individual is different. Maybe if there was a spread sheet the stipulates at "X" height and having "Y" body mass, one should weigh at least "Z" pounds to promote positive healthy body images. However, if it isn't broken down in this way, an "Overall Weight Minimum" is unrealistic and realistically, unattainable. Angel Patrice Wallace wrote this.

  • No, this sets a dangerous precedent.

    While the goal is noble, setting a minimum or a maximum weight for models is a dangerous precedent. Who would be the one to determine what an adequate weight is? I certainly agree more emphasis should be put on realistic weights, but that will only happen with constant pressure, not additional regulations.

  • The definition of 'positive body image' has changed with fashion over time.

    Who is to judge what is a positive body image. Will you ban thin models and fat models and eventually have a banal boring median model. Your models will be so boring!

    Positive body image models will become unfashionable, and the desire for super skinny and super fat models will re-emerge this will be copied by the people turning the general populations into super skinny or super fat freaks.

    The idea of positive body image will change again...with some freak wanting to models to look normal...ie. be a super skinny or super fat freak like them.


Leave a comment...
(Maximum 900 words)
No comments yet.