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  • Regulation allows for safer and more ethical business.

    This process is very debatable as to whether or not it is beneficial, though I think the real matter lies in who is arguing whether or not it is beneficial. Large corporations can be expected to argue in favor of deregulation. However, for the greater good of the country, regulation should be praised; it leads to safer, more ethical, and more equal-opportunity business.

  • Regulation allows for safer and more ethical business.

    This process is very debatable as to whether or not it is beneficial, though I think the real matter lies in who is arguing whether or not it is beneficial. Large corporations can be expected to argue in favor of deregulation. However, for the greater good of the country, regulation should be praised; it leads to safer, more ethical, and more equal-opportunity business.

  • Not a matter of lessening

    This argument is simply prodding at whether or not the government should regulate business whatsoever, Not whether or not it should be reduced in its control. Unregulated business would result in a sense of carelessness by corporations as they no longer would have to accompany a standard. Lower pay as the minimum wage wouldn't exist, FDA Regulations for safe and edible products could be tossed out the window and even children could be induced to work jobs that are either exceedingly difficult or Downright dangerous as the minimum working age would be removed. Opposing arguments On this page prod at this being a "free" america, which is in reality just not how the world works. "Free" does not imply free to do anything you want, "free" implies that you as a person have more liberties and personal freedom than that of what other countries may not have setup. Take this as an example. Drug Smuggling. In America anyone found guilty for this offence only receives prison sentencing and potential fines, Whereas in Singapore, the penalty for being found guilty of drug smuggling Is death with no argument. Take What liberties you've got for now america, It will only get worse if these are the kind of arguments that permeate today's society.

  • Yes to regulation

    Without government regulations, companies will cheat everyone until the world ends. However, the government does not help with some things, but more then once they have given us freedom in the long run. Yes the government would get more power, but without it the economy would be a mess right now.

  • Companies have no reason to be ethical!

    Without regulation, there is n reason the companies have to tell the truth or use ethical practices when making their products. Don't we have a right as consumers to know what's in our Twinkies?
    Regulation isn't just taxing. It's making sure the companies print truthful ingredient lists or advertising claims!

  • We need this!

    The government helps us not let the owners do unlawful things. Example: look at "The Jungle". And you will see what bad things they did then. Look now, and you see that they cannot do bad things with meat, or discriminate women in work areas, or even be racist owners.

  • Yes Government should regulate business

    Because the social classes are already segregated, by allowing the wealthy to continue without regulations you would be dooming the poor to be forced to stay in their social class. This could potentially eliminate the middle class. By regulating business the government can make sure the middle class and lower class have equal opportunities as the higher class.

  • Why Government should regulate business

    The Government should regulate businesses because the wealthy are just getting richer while the poor stay poor. And if you raise minimum wage it still wouldn't stop big corporation owners from making huge profits. Poor class will always make the same low minimum wage and couldn't afford many while rich can bounce back and making millions every year again even though they paid a decent amount of tax ONCE of every year not EVERYDAY. It's impossible for the poor and middle class to be remaking this much amount to recover from their losses while the rich could. Businesses should stay private and not rule the world because what happens if business corrupted us with greed for money? Taking the government out WON'T necessary make the economy recover back to it's positive financial state so why make it more worse by having "only" businessmen who only know the knowledge for business to rule a nation which has other things besides businesses?-Mei

  • Yes they should

    Without government regulations , businesses will only exploit workers to make more profit and the gap between the rich and the poor will only continue to grow. Government regulations need to be set to prevent this from ever happening. The government should regulate businesses to balance them. - Mary T.

  • Power to success

    The government should regulate business. They should be involved a lot more. If the government doesn't regulate, then businesses might lower the wages and would have people exploited. Workers deserve to be treated fair. The government needs to be involved to make things work or the economy could come down. -Luis Mata

  • Raises Prices on Goods

    Regulations should be cut because if a business is regulated, it would need to pay for the regulations, which in turn increases the price consumers have to pay. This makes people not want to participate in the United States of America's market. Also, it generates "tape" and reduces world competitiveness.

  • No the government shouldnt

    The government is going to control our business anyways. They control it enough as is and shouldn't control it more than what they are now. They need to back off some more and maybe everyone wouldn't be mad that they are taking money and trying to make us pay for things we don't need.

  • Less Government, a better economy

    Let the free market off its leash. Capitalism needs to be let loose and not restricted by government. I understand laws preventing companies from doing harm to employees, but people are not forced to stay at that job. People have the right to make their own choices and do not need government making these choices for them. I feel that the Government is basically everybody' s parents telling them what to do and how to do it. If a company has horrible employee policies than people will work somewhere else, meaning that company won't have any employees to run the business, meaning it will fail. Logic over emotion.

  • No we shouldn't

    If the government where to strep in and give small businesses money it would get rid off work effort and no one would try any more because the government is giving them money. If the government where to step in and give money to the poor and people in general then money would become useless because every body has it which would cause a money inflation and every thing would become overly expensive making another great depression.

  • No We Shouldn't

    Many other countries have dropped government regulation, and business has thrived. Government regulation does not help business, in fact, it hurts it. Some people say it is to fight fraud, but there are many laws for that already. Plus, some people say it to prevent market failure, but there is less market failure than people realize, and much of it is from government mishaps in policy.

  • This is america

    Over Regulation Costs American Businesses $1.8 Trillion Per Year Sweden recognizes that when you cut red tape and reduce regulations, innovation can thrive and entrepreneurs can flourish.

    In 2010, the Swedish Agency for Growth Policy Analysis was commissioned by the government to conduct studies of the effects of rules on enterprise.

    The commission began compiling the latest research findings on regulatory burden, regulatory simplification and regulatory impact on business; examining what effects direct and indirect costs have on businesses and the economy; conducting an analysis of other regulatory effects, excluding financial costs, on companies and how they affect the companies' behavior in regard to investments and efficiency improvement; and analyzing what effect the structure of rules has on companies' productivity.

    Their findings should not surprise anyone conducting business in America. In essence, they found that regulations prevent companies from growing and exploiting new markets; generate excessively high compliance costs for both companies and for the government; and contribute to companies becoming less capable of adapting to technological change or consumers' needs.

    Ryan Young, a fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, was a guest recently on my Made in America radio show and noted that 36 new regulations are passed in America every day, which continue to put a heavy burden on all businesses, but especially entrepreneurs.

    Most troubling is what he calls "regulation without representation," which describes the power that this administration has bestowed upon regulatory agencies allowing them to pass 3,000 regulations without Congressional approval.

    Newsmax, Neal Asbury, May 2014
    Report Post

  • This is america

    Over Regulation Costs American Businesses $1.8 Trillion Per Year Sweden recognizes that when you cut red tape and reduce regulations, innovation can thrive and entrepreneurs can flourish.

    In 2010, the Swedish Agency for Growth Policy Analysis was commissioned by the government to conduct studies of the effects of rules on enterprise.

    The commission began compiling the latest research findings on regulatory burden, regulatory simplification and regulatory impact on business; examining what effects direct and indirect costs have on businesses and the economy; conducting an analysis of other regulatory effects, excluding financial costs, on companies and how they affect the companies' behavior in regard to investments and efficiency improvement; and analyzing what effect the structure of rules has on companies' productivity.

    Their findings should not surprise anyone conducting business in America. In essence, they found that regulations prevent companies from growing and exploiting new markets; generate excessively high compliance costs for both companies and for the government; and contribute to companies becoming less capable of adapting to technological change or consumers' needs.

    Ryan Young, a fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, was a guest recently on my Made in America radio show and noted that 36 new regulations are passed in America every day, which continue to put a heavy burden on all businesses, but especially entrepreneurs.

    Most troubling is what he calls "regulation without representation," which describes the power that this administration has bestowed upon regulatory agencies allowing them to pass 3,000 regulations without Congressional approval.

    Newsmax, Neal Asbury, May 2014
    Report Post

  • This is america

    Over Regulation Costs American Businesses $1.8 Trillion Per Year Sweden recognizes that when you cut red tape and reduce regulations, innovation can thrive and entrepreneurs can flourish.

    In 2010, the Swedish Agency for Growth Policy Analysis was commissioned by the government to conduct studies of the effects of rules on enterprise.

    The commission began compiling the latest research findings on regulatory burden, regulatory simplification and regulatory impact on business; examining what effects direct and indirect costs have on businesses and the economy; conducting an analysis of other regulatory effects, excluding financial costs, on companies and how they affect the companies' behavior in regard to investments and efficiency improvement; and analyzing what effect the structure of rules has on companies' productivity.

    Their findings should not surprise anyone conducting business in America. In essence, they found that regulations prevent companies from growing and exploiting new markets; generate excessively high compliance costs for both companies and for the government; and contribute to companies becoming less capable of adapting to technological change or consumers' needs.

    Ryan Young, a fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, was a guest recently on my Made in America radio show and noted that 36 new regulations are passed in America every day, which continue to put a heavy burden on all businesses, but especially entrepreneurs.

    Most troubling is what he calls "regulation without representation," which describes the power that this administration has bestowed upon regulatory agencies allowing them to pass 3,000 regulations without Congressional approval.

    Newsmax, Neal Asbury, May 2014
    Report Post

  • Because no tyrants

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  • Over Regulation Costs American Businesses $1.8 Trillion Per Year

    Sweden recognizes that when you cut red tape and reduce regulations, innovation can thrive and entrepreneurs can flourish.

    In 2010, the Swedish Agency for Growth Policy Analysis was commissioned by the government to conduct studies of the effects of rules on enterprise.

    The commission began compiling the latest research findings on regulatory burden, regulatory simplification and regulatory impact on business; examining what effects direct and indirect costs have on businesses and the economy; conducting an analysis of other regulatory effects, excluding financial costs, on companies and how they affect the companies' behavior in regard to investments and efficiency improvement; and analyzing what effect the structure of rules has on companies' productivity.

    Their findings should not surprise anyone conducting business in America. In essence, they found that regulations prevent companies from growing and exploiting new markets; generate excessively high compliance costs for both companies and for the government; and contribute to companies becoming less capable of adapting to technological change or consumers' needs.

    Ryan Young, a fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, was a guest recently on my Made in America radio show and noted that 36 new regulations are passed in America every day, which continue to put a heavy burden on all businesses, but especially entrepreneurs.

    Most troubling is what he calls "regulation without representation," which describes the power that this administration has bestowed upon regulatory agencies allowing them to pass 3,000 regulations without Congressional approval.

    Newsmax, Neal Asbury, May 2014


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