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Should it be against the law to use profanity in public?

  • We need to show respect to other people, especially children. There are lots of ways to express anger and frustration without profanity.

    I am positive that no one truly believes that the 5th Amendment for free speech was written to enable Americans to speak obscenely in public. It is so sad to see people take laws that men died for to strengthen the freedom and integrity of our country and use them to demoralize and tear it down instead. Obscene language is lazy uneducated language. It shows a lack of respect for other people as well as ourselves.

  • Using profanity in public is a sign of ignorance.

    While I understand that individuals should be able to use the words of their choice, I do not think that people should be allowed to use profanity in public. Many parents try to keep their small children from learning "dirty" words, but despite their efforts, their children are exposed to bad language when taken into public places. Using profanity in public places is inappropriate. Honestly, if you cannot express yourself without using bad language, you need to widen your vocabulary.

  • Profanity isn't real

    What makes a word bad? The fact that we all say it's bad. That's all. There is nothing inherently offensive about a sound made by the mouth, the offense is in the ear that hears it. They're just words. I can say "feces" and it's fine but if I say say the "profane" s-word counterpart it's suddenly naughty. Two words with the exact same definition, but one of those words is "bad." The very concept of profanity is ridiculous. It's a group delusion, a mass psychosis. They're just words.

  • Not the governments concern.

    It is not the governments responsibility to tell people how to live their daily life, especially telling people what words are bad. Like what the previous responses said, a van on using certain words would be outright unconstitutional as a violation of the first amendment. Finally, why should government ban words just because society thinks a word is bad? If someone is not using a word in it's original context, why should it be considered offensive? If I said "I really don't give a crap", even though the statement is harsh, I should not be penalized because I used the word crap.

  • No it shouldn't

    First amendment: freedom of speech. As simple as that. It's not hurting anyone. If people don't like it, they can stop listening. If the government takes away the freedom of speech, how are we to say they are wrong for doing something if needed. We do not want the government to become so powerful as to control people's minds and thoughts. Then we wouldn't live in a democracy, but rather a dictatorship.

  • The First Amendment

    The first amendment gives citizens of the U.S freedom of speech. This doesn't state any regulations or restrictions that I know of. If a law is passed which is against using profane, vulgar, etc language, the law would be considered unconstitutional. Currently in my county, people don't use profane language a lot, which shouldn't effect economics.

  • No,it should not be illegal to use profanity in public.

    It should not be illegal to use profanity in public.This comes from the American right to free speech no matter how offensive it might be.People need to learn that if other's rights are curtailed theirs are sure to follow if they are not careful at all times.You may not like it but you should allow it.

  • Freedom of expression

    "bad words" really arnt that bad because if someone says oh fudge we all know what they really mean. These so called vulgar words cant be judged because then you are faced with what is profanity to some people it is acceptable to say crap and to some people the word perfect is vulgar because its expressing something that isn't possible. Making profanity in public illegal is almost the same as telling people how to act in public to some people profanity defines them. And ticketing someone for profanity seems stupid


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