Should Kabbalah be considered someone's personal connection to G-d?

  • Judaism's Spiritual Side Isn't About Following the Law

    Kabbalah, or Jewish mysticism, isn't necessarily about following the law. It's about having a personal relationship with G-d and your surroundings. Kabbalah isn't part of mainstream Judaism, but at least the practice leaves a spiritual side to the religion open for practitioners. Without a personal connection to a spiritual religion, there is no point in going to synagogue every Friday.

  • People can find a connection to God however they want

    I don't think it should matter how or why people find their connection to God. People will find it however they want and can. This is but one of many ways. I understand that some people worry that it will create Dualism or otherwise detract from the idea of one God. However, that's no reason to write it off. If someone finds Kabbalah as their personal connection, then so be it.

  • Kabbalah should be considered someone's personal connection to G-d.

    Kabbalah is a set of esoteric teachings meant to explain the relationship between the non ending mysterious space and the finite universe that was created by God. The Kabbalah has three distinct doctrines. The theosophical, ecstatic, and the magico-theurgical traditions. The ecstatic tradition strives to attain a mystical union with God.

  • No, not for most people.

    As with many complex doctrines, Kabbalah has been watered down in order to be sold and consumed to the masses of people. Kabbalah is an ancient system of Jewish mysticism and it needs an initiation period that is fairly intense, so it is not the personal gateway to the divine for most people.

  • No it should not

    No, this should not be considered a personal connection to god. All religion is a way for people to have a faith in something greater than them, and it is human nature to base things you can not explain on the supernatural. If you believe in this religion then you can have faith in what you choose.

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