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  • Yes. It will benefit them.

    On Ipads, kids can read books and take notes. Its just like a computer but way less heavy. I think that kids would greatly benefit from it. At my school, all the 9th and 10th graders get laptops to have with them during school. I think it has greatly helped them seeing they are allowed to use them during class and study hall. So yes. I think ipads should be allowed in the classroom

  • Yes I think that would be really cool :D

    I think any touch screen electric device is exciting and fun to use and can be a easier way of learning things and perhaps even faster. However they do cost a lot of money so I can see why a lot of school don't have them. If the iPads or tablets are owned by the school then I surely bet that teachers wouldn't allow students do anything else but education related.

  • It will be the way of the future

    Our kids will need to be at one with technology when they grow up because it will be the way the world functions. Sure many kids learn these skills on their own but not every child has access to learning tools like iPads. Introducing them into classrooms would help their future.

  • Technology is here.

    Classroom is moving on, lime the rest of the world. There's no space for printed documentation anymore. It's the age of technology and digital information. Sadly, books are dying out. Its hard to admit it, but it would be overestimating to say that'll happen in next few years. My guess is it would take centuries to books to disappear, it will. Digital information is far more accessible and personalised than written material.

  • Easier to learn

    It would be easier to learn so we don't have to leave the class room as much so we can get our work done on time. The fact is that having iPads we don't need to worry about getting the school iPads to the right classrooms. My name is Taten

  • Helps us learn

    You can go on Google more easier than the internet because Gnbfhsrkjfklgfb jhrfuehrgkjerhgjghkuewrlg kp3rgjoiewjrthgldsfhbeov kdrfjeklrhvnjfk rkjfngkm vnmd,fnb dm ekjbmd,gbmlb fokgbjrw m rotgjkfmvb,v lkdfvmkfdbjkrujhe;okdl;vkmdl elkberjgierojg;vceytferf fctf fjdytvjhtrygf fhgt bjreg4tjhbnfmgd eoladhcermltkbgn fvjrhvg bksdfb votrijbgkf olfdeigkr gvdlfkjbv80oitb cvrkig bvc fdjgh gbkdjhbgrkf bd;ofhnjhgfunbgn rlkigjbruthndklskm fvlkrtu jyh bflgkjhn bk,jrthg6ui bkjrhtgird bityubn rjb rkjthfkg bioretn kgjib nkr,b

  • Yes, we all should have ipads/computers!

    From my point of view, I think every students needs a way to search up information online when needed. An it would be easier for most teachers too. Mrs. Baer a teacher at my school supports this idea all the way...Do you? Please leave a comment below for my power point.

  • My school has iPads for every student each have thei own IPads are better then individuals. They have notes instead of wasting paper and citing

    My school has iPads for every student each have thei own

    IPads are better then individuals. They have notes instead of wasting paper and citing down trees and iBooks to download books also you can take test and clock and it has bookmarks and it's awesome even for elamentary school. I am in 5th grade it's good education with iPads,

  • My school has iPads for every student each have thei own

    IPads are better then individuals. They have notes instead of wasting paper and citing down trees and iBooks to download books also you can take test and clock and it has bookmarks and it's awesome even for elamentary school. I am in 5th grade it's good education with iPads,
    Hannah

  • Why Kids have I pads in the classroom.

    The purpose of at least some of this new technology is to make education—a sprawling, complicated enterprise—more streamlined, targeted and efficient. Rather than offer AP courses or a technical track, online classes can serve children at a small rural high school who want more enrichment, or students who find traditional academic learning not a good fit for them.

    Founders of the rapidly expanding chain of Rocket ship schools say when their low-income K-5th graders are fed a steady diet of computer-delivered lessons, technology “help(s) to make a child’s time in the classroom more productive because he or she will have fewer gaps preventing understanding, and Rocket ship teachers will have more time to focus on extending children’s critical thinking skills.”

    The idea embedded in much of the discussion about educational technology is that it can be cheaper than regular old bricks and mortar schools. Because kids spend so much time on computers, Rocket ship hires fewer costly teachers per class than regular district schools. Simply equipping kids with iPads, school administrators believe, is a more cost-effective investment than spending millions on poorly written, quickly outdated textbooks.

    Many teachers are embracing ed tech—blackboards and worksheets seem so last century. They are finding that using technology is altering, sometimes subtly, sometimes dramatically, the way they do their jobs.

    All that enthusiasm among school administrators and school board members has reverberated on Wall Street, which is pouring money into the sector. In 2005, investors put about $13 million of venture and growth capital in the K-12 market. In 2011, venture capitalists poured $389 million into companies focused on K-12 education, according to industry analysts GSV Advisors, a Chicago-based education firm that tracks the K-12 market.

    “First, the promoters’ exhilaration splashes over decision makers as they purchase and deploy equipment in schools and classrooms,” said Larry Cuban, professor emeritus of education at Stanford University and author of Oversold and Underused: Computers in the Classroom in an email to me. “Then academics conduct studies to determine the effectiveness of the innovation [and find that it is] just as good as—seldom superior to—conventional instruction in conveying information and teaching skills. Scarce dollars on expensive machinery that fails to display superiority over existing techniques of instruction and, even worse, is only occasionally used.”

    Troublingly, that cycle may have already begun. Computer labs, once outside the classroom, are
    being brought into the classroom and monitored by a skilled educator. And their partnership with a tech startup, which was coming up with software to aggregate student data and help teachers plan their lessons, has ended."

    Parents and taxpayers, be cautious. We need to take care not to let hype overtake good judgment.”

    iPads in the classroom, too, are hardly turning out to be a panacea. Teachers in some schools use iPads to great effect. Most, not. And they are not likely to lead to cost savings.

  • I've been able to learn from two countries

    I was born in England and started going to primary school at 4 years of age, but I left to go to New Zealand when I was nine. In that time in England I had not strict, but tough teachers who were able to make us learn. We learnt spelling and hand writing in particular), maths, and capitols of the world off by heart and had races to see who could name the countries or numbers first.
    When I came over to New Zealand when I was nine there was a totally different mind set and the structure of the learning system at schools made it really easy for me. (Even though I had had problems and been into hospital just a few months before and my mind wasn't repaired. Had a bleed/ stroke).
    Children in New Zealand and I'm guessing in certain parts of the world weren't doing the fundamentals of children's schooling life, like learning 'how' to write or learning 'how' to do multiplication. If we load schools with IPADS and technology gear how can we ever hope to teach them the main things like the English language.

  • Throwing away money doesn't produce sophisticated students.

    Children in Belgium who's schools receive less resources do better on international tests. Why is that? Because America, lacks a bluntly sophisticated curriculum backed by qualified teachers and professors who are just as compassionate about teaching as they are hands on, intelligent, and disciplined.

    Almost all of New York's planning for education seems engineered to make us stupid. Cheating has grown prevalent in America's education system as a whole. Why do we need the highest tech computers to learn things that people excelled at years before without them? Why do schools pay for so many programs and events that barely have a lasting impact on the majority of the child / student demographic?

  • My school has iPads for every student each have thei own

    IPads are better then individuals. They have notes instead of wasting paper and citing down trees and iBooks to download books also you can take test and clock and it has bookmarks and it's awesome even for elamentary school. I am in 5th grade it's good education with iPads,
    Hannah


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