Amazon.com Widgets

Should kids with autism be taught in a different school?

  • Kids with autism should be taught in a different school.

    Autism is a serious condition that requires special care and attention. It would not be right to allow students with autism to be in the same classroom with other students. Also, it would put too much pressure on teachers who are not specially trained to deal with autistic students and their needs.

  • Autism Disrupts Classes

    As a student taught in a mainstream school, I know the pain of autistic kids. There is an average of one autistic per classroom, and it commonly disrupts the learning environment, In recent years, I have seen many classrooms disrupted by a call for "iPad!!!" or "Hungry!!!" in the middle of an important lesson, sometimes even a test. I understand the argument for mainstreaming, but by the time that making the... Lesser... Kids feel better by putting them in normal classes infringes upon the learning environment of those who actually have opportunity (keeping autistics in the same school as normals) , that's going too far.

  • Autistic Children Disrupt Classes!!!!!>:(

    Mainstreaming schools is probably the WORST idea I can imagine. Being a student in a mainstreamed school district, I should know. What many supporters of mainstreaming don't realize is that many of these children infringe upon the learning environment of normal students. I find it very distracting while focusing on a new math concept or taking a test to hear a loud call for "IPAD!!!!!" or "HUNGRY!!!". Yes, this is what autistics do, and I once did poorly on a test for this behavior. To allow for a better learning environment for normal students, just move the autistics to another room or even school! Please? If you do it, many students thank you in advance.

  • Yes they should.

    I went to a mainstream primary school with a boy who had autism. To me it was absolutely pointless and was a bad experience for not only him but also the other pupils. He was constantly being provoked into lashing out/having a tantrum and teased by the other pupils and the other pupils had to put up with constant disturbances and distractions in the classroom. Plus he wasn't even learning the same stuff as the other pupils in the class so I don't see the point in him being in the class. I think it would be better for all concerned that children with autism are taught in different schools.

  • Kids with autism disrupt classes!

    I am a student at a mainstream school where autistic children go, I studied the pain and the behavior of autistic children. There is an average of one autistic kid per class, and it commonly distracts us from our learning experiences. In recent years, when in the middle of learning an important lesson, or especially taking a test. I have heard many classrooms disrupted by a call for "IPAD!" or "HUNGRY!". I understand the argument for mainstreaming, but by the time of making the Lesser kids feel better by putting them in normal classes infringes upon the learning environment of those who actually have opportunity (keeping autism in the same school as normal) that's going too far.

  • Stress + Disruption

    Some autistic kids disrupt classes. Those few kids scream a lot, give goofy looks to other kids (kind of creepy), and talk like a lunatic. They will get poor grades, as following directions may be hard, and will be bullied. They might commit suicide as a teen, because kids alienate them. The kids also cost the school a lot. The special ed rooms at my school had Ipads, and LOTS of toys. LOTS of expensive gadgets to please them. While others can behave very well (I had a really nice autistic friend), most kids will shun them, and even run away from them. This can have bad effects on them, if it continues. Clearly, it is bad for the child, and bad for the pupils.

  • Yes they should

    When my sister, who is autistic, went to mainstream school, she had lots of anxiety and stress. The teachers didn't understand her, and she needed help. After, she went to a special school where she could get the attention and help that she needed. Overall, I think children with autism should go to a special school.

  • Only if they also have severe behaviour problems or anxiety.

    I went to a special school aged 9 because of behaviour problems associated with autism but if their anxiety or behaviour problems are mild then they could be taught in a special classroom. I'm going to college next year and I 'm going on a course for students with autism.

  • Wouldn't they learn better

    I believe with many other people that they would learn better because they can be focused on their school work, instead of at a regular school, where they would be worried of people thinking of them weirdly or being subjected to being bullied. They are also a disruption in class an a stress to the teacher. But this is not rude or anything like that I know it seems like segregation but i believe it is for they're own good.

  • If they continually disrupt learning for other students and place undue stress on the teacher

    Violence, running around the class, consuming more of the teacher's time than the rest of the class.... It's simply ridiculous to allow this. Bring back special Ed classes if they can't assimilate. If they can behave with a little extra help, fine.

    And please do not claim discrimination. All children have the right to an education, including "neurotypical" kids. They have rights too.

  • As A Teen With Autism

    Although I do not have severe autism I was diagnosed with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) three years ago. By now you might be thinking how can he know if it's better for them. Well let me tell you how on my mothers side her siblings each have a child with autism one of them has a child with severe autism the other has a child with Aspergers Syndrome like me. As the oldest of the three I think I speak for both of them when I say that taking school with people that are not on the spectrum has been a blessing for all of us. Our peers have said in example for us for what is socially appropriate, And when I look back on the three years since I was diagnosed I see that school has help me change for the better. Not saying that autism is a curse, but I should probably wrap this up because I'm starting to type ramble. To sum it up although I do not have severe autism I so know how it is to live with autism. Because with all the meltdowns at home, to all the times I cried at school, in the long run I would never take that away from me or anyone else. And, if you think that we aren't normal then let me ask you a question "If everything someone with autism thinks and does is not normal, then is wanting a chance to live your life not normal?" Just take some time to step in my shoes and see how it would feel if because of something you couldn't control made it so you couldn't have at least some chance of a normal life.

  • As A Teen With Autism

    Although I am not full-blown autism I was diagnosed with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) three years ago. By now you might be thinking how can he know if it's better for them. Well let me tell you how on my mothers side her siblings each have a child with autism one of them has a child with severe autism the other has a child with Aspergers Syndrome like me. As the oldest of the three I think I speak for both of them when I say that taking school with people that are not on the spectrum has been a blessing for all of us. Our peers have said in example for us for what is socially appropriate, And when I look back on the three years since I was diagnosed I see that school has help me change for the better. Not saying that autism is a curse, but I should probably wrap this up because I'm starting to type ramble. To sum it up although I do not have severe autism I so know how it is to live with autism. Because with all the meltdowns at home, to all the times I cried at school, in the long run I would never take that away from me or anyone else. And, if you think that we aren't normal then let me ask you a question "If everything someone with autism thinks and does is not normal, then is wanting a chance to live your life not normal?" Just take some time to step in my shoes and see how it would feel if because of something you couldn't control made it so you couldn't have at least some chance of a normal life.

  • As A Teen With Autism

    Although I am not full blown autistic I have been diagnosed with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) for three years. After that sentence your probably thinking that he couldn't have any insight. Well I do, on my mothers side each of her siblings have a child on the spectrum, one has a child with severe autism, and the other had Aspergers like me. If I can tell you one thing it's that being in school with children without autism has been a blessing in my life and my cousins lives as well because we have had an example of what is socially appropriate, and what is not. Over the course of the three years knowing that I have had Autism I have seen a change for the better in me. Now that doesn't mean that autism isn't a curse for me, but anyway I'm starting to ramble type. So, to sum it up although I don't have severe autism I still have it from the meltdowns at home to the few times that I've cried at school, I have had a better experience at school then out of it. So anyone that says that we should be away from the normal children, let me ask you something "If autistic children and what they do and think are not normal, than is wanting a chance at life not normal too." Just try walking In our shoes.

  • Children with autism should be taught in same schools as others.

    Mozart, Tim Burton, Andy Warhol, Temple Grandin, Einstein, Newton, Darwin, Thomas Jefferson, Michelangelo. Autistic brains tend to have the functions as the normal brains except for two conditions. 1: They have an abnormal corpus callosum which doesn't let one side of the brain interact fluently with the other causing problems at the time of expressing socially with others. 2: They also have an abnormal cerebellum, this one operates its nervous, compulsory and sensitive system. This is why they are more able to retain images and dialogues from movies that they only see once.
    It isn't that they are abnormal, it is that we aren't able to see their intelligence and capacity below their social skills to communicate with others.
    We need to integrate these children. We need to help them develop their avility to transmit their knowledge. Please.

  • People with autism should be taught in the same schools as others.

    Mozart, Tim Burton, Andy Warhol, Temple Grandin, Einstein, Newton, Darwin, Thomas Jefferson, Michelangelo. Autistic brains tend to have the functions as the normal brains except for two conditions. 1: They have an abnormal corpus callosum which doesn't let one side of the brain interact fluently with the other causing problems at the time of expressing socially with others. 2: They also have an abnormal cerebellum, this one operates its nervous, compulsory and sensitive system. This is why they are more able to retain images and dialogues from movies that they only see once.
    It isn't that they are abnormal, it is that we aren't able to see their intelligence and capacity below their social skills to communicate with others.

  • There is nothing wrong with autistic people!

    To be honest, it depends on how high functioning they are. For example, I have autism but I go to a regular school. Some people call me weird. I don't care. People are people! No matter if they are autistic or not, nothing is wrong with us! We are people too and we should be taught depending on how high functioning we are.

  • They need interaction!

    Autistic children are simply children that are slightly different than us. But that doesn't mean they can't be with us. They deserve their own classroom, but in a public school with other kinds of children as well. Teach the other children to accept them, be kind to them, help them, say hi, etc. while the children with autism should be learning how to interact with them and such so that they know eventually how to do it. That way it isn't just thrown at them one day, no, instead they were taught early on how to function with normal people.

  • Right to equality

    We talk of equality but only talk, We must implement it. I know an autistic child who is going to normal school and is also being bullied by so called normal children. He stood sixth in a class of 35 students surprising everyone. He screams, asks for snacks and does all like other autistic children. He is forced to sit alone in the last bench but still defeats normal students.

  • No, they shouldn't.

    I would understand how frustrating it can be to have a autistic kid may disrupt, however, it good for those classes to understand that not everyone is the same, and it teaches them to tolerate any special kid. I don't think public school is the way to go, but putting them in a school meant purely for autistic kids a bad idea.

  • Autistic children help their peers

    Children who are on the autism spectrum have a different life than children not on the spectrum. Some are very low-functioning and require a lot of one-on-one care and supervision. Others, however, are more functioning and able to do much on their own. Either way, their life is a constant struggle. I have two cousins who are on the Autism spectrum. Both are mainstreamed and also have specialists they see during the week. It is important that they spend time working with their counselors to be sure they are keeping up with their goals and progressing through school properly. However, they also are benefiting from being in their everyday classes with their peers. They aren’t spending the whole day sent away doing all their work with a specialist. By allowing children on the Autism spectrum to be involved in classes with their peers, it allows for further education from the several forms of learning, such as visual, audial, and kinesthetic. We each have a preferred way of learning, and by mainstreaming Autistic children, we are allowing for more opportunities to learn and grow in the classroom. Something we have seen as a family is also the impact they are making on the lives of others in their classes. Their peers are learning so much about people and their differences by being involved with these students in the classroom setting. My cousin Nick has a hard time socially, as most Autistic children do, but he has been able to befriend his peers and influence their lives in ways they wouldn’t imagine had he not been mainstreamed in their classes.


Leave a comment...
(Maximum 900 words)
No comments yet.