Amazon.com Widgets

Should Maserati open up factories in the United States in order to expand its exposure in that nation?

  • No, Maserati should not open factories in the USA for business puproses.

    I think it would be a mistake for Maserati to think that having factories in the United State will make the brand more popular in America. Maserati has way too many other sports car companies to compete with. And those other brands are doing well without factories in America. If Maserati wants to compete, they need to build a better car.

  • Of course they do.

    Maserati should open factories in the United States, because it is one of the most capitalist based economies in the world, with a vast number of wealthy people willing to throw their money around. For them, it would be very good for business and profits would rise drastically and quickly.

  • It's best to connect.

    Yes, Maserati should open up factories in the United States in order to expand its exposure in that nation, because it is always good to manufacture the cars close to the consumers. People have good impressions of Italian cars. Maserati is owned by Ferrari, so they have a lot of brand recognition already.

  • Maserati should not open up factories in the United States in order to expand its exposure in this nation.

    Maserati should not open up factories in the United States in order to expand its exposure in this nation. Maserati is primarily bought by wealthy people and part of the appeal is that Maserati is a foreign car. Domestic cars in the U.S. have a poor reputation for quality and therefore Maserati would lose interest if it were to open a factory within the United States.

  • That would not fit in with their brand image.

    Maserati would have to do a lot more than open up factories in the United States to expand its exposure. They've cultivated a reputation in North America for being the manufacturers of exotic sports cars. People value them in part, because they're custom made in Italy. Mass production in America would devalue their brand's cachet.


Leave a comment...
(Maximum 900 words)
No comments yet.