Should modern college science students be required to read Galileo's writings?

  • great science studies

    Yes, as a current science student attending college right now, I feel like I would gain a lot from reading his writings. He was a very good scientist, who changed the worlds view of the universe and how the universe works. His findings were the most important finding ever found.

  • Modern college science students should be required to read Galileo.

    Modern college science students should be required to read Galileo.Scientists should not only understand the world around but where the major thoughts in their field of study came from.They should also understand that free exchange of thoughts is a privilege that not all people can take advantage of on a regular basis.

  • The History of Science is Important

    Although Galileo's writings might be out of date and some have been proven wrong, it is important for modern college students to understand the history of science. This base point will inspire and show students how far we have come in the name of science. College is about a well rounded education, so history is an important factor.

  • Galileo, Newton, Einstein

    College science students should be required to read Galileo, Sir Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein as part of any science degree. Without those three men, the field of science is back in the Dark Ages. Galileo set the tone by publishing writings and theories that were different than that of the Catholic Church. Then Newton came along and figured out what gravity did to everyday objects. Einstein then improved upon Newton's F=m*a equation to read E=m*c^2.

  • Not A Requirement

    I do not believe modern college science students should be required to thoroughly read Galileo's writings. While studying Galileo in a historical aspect would be very important to these students I don't think it's necessary to read all of his work since his discoveries are actually very basic compared to modern science.

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