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Should parents genetically engineer their children?

  • Parents can do whatever they want to their children, in certain terms

    When it comes to parents trying to conceive a child, they can do whatever they want or whatever it takes to have the child they want. There are already people having certain DNA placed in them to achieve a certain desired outcome. The real important part is how they treat their child once they are born.

  • If they like

    Regardless of how people feel about genetic engineering, the genetic engineering procedures being developed will be the next step in birth. Parents will want the best for their children, and procedures such as preventing possible diseases or even choosing physical characteristics will become the norm for many in the future.

  • Yes, parents should do what they can to give their children the best life possible.

    I think parents should definitely consider genetically engineering their children. Anything that can be done to give a child a better start in life is acceptable. Beyond engineering for blond hair and blue eyes, a parent might be able to remove genetic markers for certain diseases. I think science is headed in the direction where one day it will be common practice.

  • This should not even be a debate

    My first point is that the hold doesn't have a say in this. It's kind if a big deal, and they can't consent while they're still in their mothers womb. It's the child's life-- NOT the parent's. It sickens me to see people writing "it's the parent's child, they can do what they want with it," because this disregards the child of having their own will and life to make their own decisions.

    Another reason modifying children is absurd is because it has a potential to be dangerous. Tests have tried modifying animals and the outcome wasn't always as planned. And yes, I understand humans and animals used for testing are 2 different species, but things can still go wrong. It also interferes with that child's genetics. Everyone is different, so any kind of experiment will go differently in some way.

    Also, parents should love their child despite them not being the perfect Jesus Christ they wished they had. It's common sense.

    This is wrong and should not even be up for debate.

  • This should not even be a debate

    My first point is that the hold doesn't have a say in this. It's kind if a big deal, and they can't consent while they're still in their mothers womb. It's the child's life-- NOT the parent's. It sickens me to see people writing "it's the parent's child, they can do what they want with it," because this disregards the child of having their own will and life to make their own decisions.

    Another reason modifying children is absurd is because it has a potential to be dangerous. Tests have tried modifying animals and the outcome wasn't always as planned. And yes, I understand humans and animals used for testing are 2 different species, but things can still go wrong. It also interferes with that child's genetics. Everyone is different, so any kind of experiment will go differently in some way.

    Also, parents should love their child despite them not being the perfect Jesus Christ they wished they had. It's common sense.

    This is wrong and should not even be up for debate.

  • Genetically engineer kids is unnatural

    Messing with human development through genetic engineering is a dangerous process. We are interfering with the natural order of life and the way it is naturally suppose to happen. If we get involved by genetically altering the DNA makeup of our kids, we could run the risk of creating unstable children.

  • No, love of one's children is not dependent upon the structure of their DNA.

    The concept of permitting generic engineering of ones child is a frightening one. The love that exists between a parent and a child is the only unconditional love that exists. All other love has boundaries and expectations. To genetically engineer your child would eliminate unconditional love and as such diminish our overall human capacity for love.


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