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Should parents protect children from experiencing unhappiness?

  • If it's not necessary I see no reason why

    I believe parents should aim to create a safe haven for their children as mush as possible that is predominantly happy and peaceful. As the child grows and matures, they will have already developed a stable sense of self in a loving, caring environment and thus be better able to recognize and compassionately respond to the harsher challenges of life.

  • I believe that parents should protect their children from unnecessary unhappiness, and they can start by teaching coping skills.

    Unhappiness cannot be totally avoided, but it is totally natural for a parent to want to spare his child from unnecessary sadness. A parent can only do this to the best of his ability, but can start by teaching a child to cope with everyday life. Properly respecting the child and valuing his thoughts and feelings will give him the strength to become someone who can deal with everyday unhappiness.

    Posted by: R Bowen
  • They will expereince it anyway sooner or later.

    Shielding a child from reality may result in them becoming naïve and unprepared for the “real” world when they grow up. They may also have unrealistic expectations of themselves and others and may end up feeling hurt or confused when they start to experience the “reality” that they were sheltered from. In the end, they will not benefit from the lack of learning from a new feeling and when they experience it in the future with no support from their parents to help them, they will not adapt well and may become confused and lost in the unfamiliar world.

  • You can't protect them forever

    Shielding your kids from unhappiness only makes them naive and unprepared for the real world. When they grow up, how are they going to handle anything? Would they just break down and start crying? Perhaps not, but unhappiness is part of life, and you can't protect your children their whole lives

  • No, they should just provide comfort.

    Unhappiness is part of the human experience just as happiness is. We can not and should not protect our children from this emotional experience or they will have no resiliance. If they are very young, a cushion can be established, but most of the time the role of the adult is merely to provide that comfort and reassurance of love needed in a sad experience.

  • Emotional ups and downs are a natural part of life, and to shield a child from all unhappiness is to create unnatural ideals of what life in the "real world" is like.

    Humans learn best from experience. Experiences in life are both good and bad. Both positive and negative experiences invoke emotional responses. A child who is consistently protected from any unhappiness will not develop the emotional skills needed to deal with negative experiences in adult life. Failure to develop the skills needed to properly handle negative emotions, such as unhappiness, may lead to a type of idealistic view, which is unrealistic in today's society. Unhappiness, disappointment, sadness, and grief are all emotions that need to be dealt with as a child, in order to form proper coping skills as an adult.

    Posted by: CowardlyJoan92
  • I disagree with not letting children experience unhappiness, because it will only hurt them in the long run.

    I believe that shielding a child from unhappiness will only make it worse for them in the long run. They should learn to deal with all feelings, both good and bad.

    Posted by: GrubbyMariano
  • Children should not be protected from unhappiness, as it will be a fact of life for them at some point.

    Parents should shield their children from harm, but to shield them from unhappiness is unrealistic and does not provide them with a basis for coping with life. All human beings will suffer from unhappiness throughout their lives, and if children are not exposed to minor unhappiness when young, then they will be unable to cope with major unhappiness as they grow older. It is the responsibility of parents to prepare their children for the reality of life, and that includes the unhappiness they will undoubtedly experience.

    Posted by: AndonNic3r

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