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Should physicians be given the capability to prescribe medical marijuana based on a patients physical symptoms and medical condition?

  • Yes, its neccassary.

    Say there is an older gentleman, he has insomnia and is already taking so many medications that he can't afford anything else to cause harm to his liver, and I shall say, smoking marijuana may harm your lungs, but you NEVER hear of anyone dying from marijuana, only cigarettes, right?

  • medical marijauna has no medical problems

    there is no medical prof that marijuana has any kind of health hazards.... some people have said that it has cancerous cells and that is a load of bull there is no tar in marijuana and it is better than getting addicted to pills such as vicodin and oxycodon so yes it should be prescribed

  • I think doctors should be allowed to write prescriptions for medical marijuana when they think their patients need it.

    I think it should be up to the doctor and his patient to decide on the kind of treatment or medication prescribed. The government should play no role in it at all. In fact, the government should get out of the process of drug regulation, in general, and let the people and doctors decide if they will take an experimental drug. I would like to see the FDA abolished.

    Posted by: WoozyEusebio
  • Yes, physicians should be able to prescribe medical marijuana based on a patients physical symptoms and medical condition.

    Numerous studies have shown that marijuana is more effective than other drugs in relieving neuropathic pain. Many ill people use marijuana as a medication despite its illegality, thereby risking arrest and possible jail time. It is immoral, unjust and unfeeling to put seriously ill people in a position to choose between living with their pain or engaging in an illegal act in order to relieve it.

    Posted by: GrandioseFrank59
  • There is proof that medical marijuana can be useful in alleviating symptoms in some people that traditional pharmaceuticals do not.

    The use of medical marijuana definitely has a place in our treatment options. There are symptoms that cannot be relieved by big pharmaceutical products. I think a big part of the opposition to medical marijuana is fueled by big pharmaceutical companies. Here is an example: antiemetics commonly given to chemo patients cost $50 per pill. The same effect can be achieved more quickly and less expensively by marijuana. If the patient was the only focus, then marijuana is the answer.

    Posted by: EweIICist
  • Physicians should be able to prescribe medical marijuana for a patient's medical condition because, often, pharmaceuticals are ineffective and have side effects.

    Many health problems that people face today cannot be adequately alleviated by pharmaceutical drugs. People suffer from anxiety, depression, among other ailments, and the drugs that doctors prescribe for their patients are either ineffective or have debilitating side effects, such as nausea, tiredness, or panic attacks. While marijuana should not be a first line treatment, I think it should be an additional option that should be available, should the legal pharmaceutical drugs be ineffective for the patient.

    Posted by: SoWinif
  • Yes, because I think that marijuana should be legal and not even need a prescription.

    There is no reason, in this day and age, that a harmless drug like marijuana should still be illegal. I think that, if a doctor thinks that marijuana will help a patient, then the doctor should have no restrictions on treating them the best way they can. I know that this opens the door for other drugs, such as cocaine, to be debated, but I think that a little weed to help someone is harmless.

    Posted by: 5c0tJung
  • If medical marijuana can help, then the doctor should prescribe it.

    The only reason people take issue with marijuana is because it is illegal. That's it. One would be hard pressed to find any concrete data that proves that marijuana is any worse than any other, especially man made, drug out there available for medical purposes. Make it legal for medical use and prescribe it if it will help treatment. I just don't see how natural can be any worse than synthetic drugs we make, that people do indeed die from on occasion.

    Posted by: gwynisin
  • Physicians should be able to prescribe medical marijuana, because it is no worse than the prescription painkillers that are prescribed.

    Physicians should be given the ability to prescribe medical marijuana where they see fit. We read in the papers about prescription painkillers and anti-depressants that are prescribed by doctors, and people are overdosing from them. There are millions of people in this country buying marijuana to treat themselves for medical issues, because the drug is so readily available. Truthfully, when is the last time you read someone dying from a marijuana overdose?

    Posted by: WillowsErv
  • Yes, physicians should be able to prescribe medical marijuana based on patients physical symptoms and medical condition. It is often the best natural ways to treat symptoms.

    Medicinal marijuana has been used for years. In my opinion, prescribing marijuana is much better than prescribing a patient drugs. At least with marijuana, we already know the side effects that the patient will experience. It is the one of the best natural ways to go about ridding the patient of their symptoms. It's only the abuse of the drug which makes the medical community question it.

    Posted by: Qu4ntBenj
  • No No No

    Marijuana should not be given to anybody its a flip'in drug. No one should have it in the first place. Marijuana and drugs over all should be eradicated from the state of new jersey. I understand that it can help people but people are stupid they will take more then they need.

  • No No No

    Marijuana should not be given to anybody its a flip'in drug. No one should have it in the first place. Marijuana and drugs over all should be eradicated from the state of new jersey. I understand that it can help people but people are stupid they will take more then they need.

  • Marijuana makes people act and think differently.

    I say no because marijuana is a drug that makes people act and think different from their usual way. Little do these people know marijuana is something that calms you down but it also messes with your brain cells. Now I'm no one to tell you what to do, I'm just giving you advice that can save your life. So, no, you should not smoke pot and doctors should not be able to give it to you.

  • My life, my choice.

    Doctors only know what the drug representatives tell them or what they were taught in school during the ban on herbs. In other words, until doctors are able to study every type of medicine available, including traditional, historic remedies versus pharmaceutical drugs; they are not in the best position to prescribe what is best for my health when all they do is push pills.

  • Medical marijuana is an oxymoron.

    Not enough study has been done on the long term effects of marijuana. Most studies in the past have had a definite positive bias. Marijuana became "acceptable" in the 1960's. Strangely enough, the incidence of autism, type two diabetes and obesity began to spike at about the same time. To the best of my knowledge, no study has been done on the correlation between marijuana use and genetic change with resultant medical conditions. If credible studies were done and marijuana was found to be safe, I would support complete legalization.

    Posted by: jackprague94
  • Marijuana is a type of drug and if the physicians are allowed to prescribe marijuana then it would increase substantially the number of drug addicts.

    The physicians should NEVER be given the authority/capability to prescribe marijuana on medical grounds irrespective of the physical symptoms and medical condition of the patient as it would become easy for anyone to have a prescription issued from the family physician. This would ultimately increase the number of drug addicts substantially.

    Posted by: babyphatgurl

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