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Should police departments use roadside drug tests if they know they are occasionally inaccurate?

  • Yes, they should

    Roadside drug tests, while sometimes inaccurate, can be used responsibly as preliminary tests to signal who might need to be laboratory tested for drugs. There should be rules and regulations as to who is administered a roadside drug test so as to avoid discriminatory application and civil rights violations, but in general there is nothing wrong with an imperfect test as long as it is not the last word in the individual's case.

  • No, let them conduct the test at a facility.

    The police departments should not use roadside drug tests if they know they are occasionally inaccurate because they might not be able ti get even a conviction in the court of law in the event they are asked to prove their reliability. This will lead to drug users walking free.

  • No, the police should not use roadside drug tests since they are inaccurate.

    No, the police should not be able to use roadside drug tests since they are inaccurate. Many of the tests are wildly inaccurate. Instead, if the police suspect that a person may be under the influence of drugs, they should note their observations and request a warrant to perform accurate testing at the police station.

  • No, roadside drug tests should not be discontinued.

    No, roadside drug tests should not be discontinued even if they are occasionally inaccurate because there is the probability of them being accurate and getting a drunk driver off the streets. Several roadside drug tests have proven accurate and kept drunk drivers from hurting themselves or someone else on the road.


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