Should prayer and religious symbols be permitted in public settings?

  • Freedom of speech

    Haha, this is a dumb question, I pray all the time in public with my tallit and yamaca on but no one cares, people seem to think this is a big issue but its not, freedom of religion is big in America but atheist groups are trying to tell us otherwise. The agnostic on the other side is obviously easily annoyed, well, it doesn't happen often, but people do pray out loud, and I know its hard to accept defeat, but atheists and agnostics are wrong, and they don't want to admit it. It is sometimes hard to admit that you cannot win against something, but religion will be around forever, we have to have an explanation that isn't one word long like "science".

  • Yes, they should be permitted

    Religious symbols and prayer should be permitted in public settings - just so long as they are not endorsed by the government. We have a clear separation of church and state in this country, which prevents the government from endorsing any particular religion, but we also have have freedom of religion, which allows individuals to worship (or not) as they see fit.

  • Yes, if it is fine

    You can't take away a persons right to freedom of religion,but that is America. If your speaking of other countries, then I might have a different answer. The backlash from that may cause riots. I think everyone has the right to express themselves in a way that they feel is fine to their religion.

  • Yes, prayer and religious symbols should be permitted in public settings.

    The separation of church and state implies that the government will not endorse any one religion or force it upon the people. Individuals (not acting as representatives of the government) are free to practice their religion in almost any way, even in public settings. If I bring a cross to the courthouse, that is allowed. If the mayor builds a permanent cross at the courthouse, that is not allowed.

  • Please don't be an idiot about this

    Is this even a question? Like passing hate legislation? Literally restricting religious freedom in an area that's entirely unnecessary. If someone prays in public are they hurting me? No. Are they wasting there time? I don't know, but I also don't have a crap. I'm sorry if you're offended by someone's prayer or religious symbol (actually I don't give a crap about that either), but unless someone's actually infringing on any of your rights, the law shouldn't care. Voting "no" is verifiably stupid, ignorant and hateful.

  • Yes, the right to freedom of religion and free speech guarantees this in the United States and I support the philosophy.

    Permitting prayer, religious symbols, and other aspects of one's freedom of religion, as long as it is not endorse by the government, is a basic human right. Someone saying a prayer or wearing a pentacle or a crucifix does not force me into participating in their religion. Someone's right to "freedom from religion" should not infringe on someone else's freedom to practice his religion without fear. One's annoyance at someone else's beliefs is just that--annoyance. It does not constitute a right that one should be able to walk through life completely free of annoyances at the cost of others' rights.

  • the arrogance of religion

    I am an agnostic. I was brought up catholic but I had no interest in any type of religion. I do think it is arrogant for any religion to force people to listen to prayers or look at religious symbols. Just as they would not want to hear my argument as to why I am an agnostic, I don't want to listen to any of their ancient and dubious rituals.

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