• What about forcing kids to learn evolution?

    Evolution is all about a belief that interferes with our religions and beliefs. So we have to learn about it anyway but we challenge if we're allowed to follow our own traditions? Obviously they shouldn't be required (Unless of course it is a Christian school as that is expected) because no one should be forced to believe in something. But how is that any different from being taught evolution? It's just a theory that some people may BELIEVE in. Some people BELIEVE in the story of evolution. And just bowing your head and thanking God? Have you seen all the churches? How can this not be expected? People are CHRISTIANS in America. Praying won't kill anyone.

  • Yes, it is freedom.

    Yes, prayer should be allowed in schools, just like students are allowed to wear clothes with writing on them, or say things to classmates that express their opinion on certain topics. The founding fathers wanted freedom of religion, not freedom from religion. It is unfair to oppress freedom of speech in our nation's schools.

  • I support prayer in schools

    The world was a better place during the times when prayer was allowed in schools. There was less crime, less drugs, and less teen pregnancy. Until our nations children have a conscious towards God, I don't see it getting any better. Our country needs to stop denying God, quit violating the rights of the many for the sake of "offending" a few. This is why I support prayer in schools.

  • Prayer should be allowed.

    Everyone has the right to freedom of religion. For someone's rights to be taken away to pray isn't fair to the people who believe in God. If you want to pray, then pray. If you don't want to, then don't. Everyone has their own beliefs so let them do as they wish.

  • Yes, prayer should be permitted, but not required

    Students and staff members should be permitted to pray in schools, as long as it's not required of either. Freedom of religion should mean freedom everywhere as long as it does not harm anyone else, or infringe on anyone else's right not to pray. There is no compelling reason to prohibit prayer in schools.

  • Yes, prayer should be permitted in schools--but not required.

    In light of the recent school tragedies that have taken place, people are searching for peace and comfort in the school environment. For some people, prayer is the way to accomplish this. Those who believe in prayer should be allowed to express their spirituality at school. However, those who don't pray shouldn't be made participate if they are not comfortable.

  • It already is

    It already is. Schools cannot require it, but students cab do it if they want to. I'm an atheist, but if you want to pray in school, go ahead. It is fine to pray in school as long as schools do not force kids to. So of course it is, it is already allowed.

  • It already is

    It already is. Schools cannot require it, but students cab do it if they want to. I'm an atheist, but if you want to pray in school, go ahead. It is fine to pray in school as long as schools do not force kids to. So of course it is, it is already allowed.

  • Prayers already occur in school. We should advertising the fact.

    I was raised very, very, Mormon. While I later chose a different faith for myself as an adult, while i was growing up, prayer was an active part of my worship. I was the kid who prayed before every meal at school. Guess what? I wasn't arrested, suspended, or even harassed about it. My only caveat, is that teachers and staff should not be allowed to use their roles as public servants to push their personal religious beliefs. The worst of the bunch do so of course, but usually using rather passive-aggressive methods. It should be clear that this is inappropriate behavior during "class time". However student run org's with faculty advisers, most certainly should be allowed to operate normally, even at the high school level. Any staff "adviser" could properly reference the fact that they represent such and such club, and act in that capacity when called upon, including the odd shout out in class, provided they used sufficient tact.

  • Of course you should...

    Yes you should because god loves us, and we need to tell and show him the we love him back as much as we can. Have you ever gotten in trouble, at school, work, home etc. and you just hope that you don't get in more trouble... That is praying. You pray without even knowing that you are. So that tells me that no matter what religion you are, or even if you don't have a religion, you can still pray, and still love god.

  • No.

    Forgive me if I'm wrong, but I think the Constitution grants Freedom of Religion to all residents in the United States. Every belief is different. Praying in a diverse area would only sway beliefs—and would most likely threaten a lot of people. Making someone feel alienated, because of their religious belief, would be immoral. Thus, it would be no good to allow prayers in school. Just no.

  • It Depends

    If by allowing prayer, you mean someone themselves praying alone or with some friends, independent of the school curriculum, then by all means it should be allowed. Current laws don't ban that sort of activity. Stories of kids being expelled for saying grace to themselves in the school cafeteria are just myths and have little or no basis in fact. My objection is a school mandated prayer that all children are forced to participate in, or at least tolerate. The same people who demand school prayer would be horrified if schools had everyone kneel and pray while facing Mecca, and many of these same people have shut down yoga programs in school as well, on the ground that they promote Hinduism. This country is made up of many different faiths and beliefs and we cannot have our tax money being used to promote or endorse one religion or system of belief. Besides, Jesus, in the Bible, said that prayer is supposed to be a private thing between yourself and God, and not something to make a show of.

  • Public schools need to be free from coercion when it comes to Religious observations.

    Public schools are created for all children, whether they be Jewish, Catholic, Buddhist, Islamic etcetera. This therefore entails that a public location whose sole purpose is to educate, and is in turn paid for with tax payer money distributed by the Government, has no place to instill beliefs and tread upon the sacred duty of parents to educate their children in terms of Religious observations. In previous decades when Religion has invaded our schools it has singled out the Jewish child, the child from an agnostic family and especially the atheist. This further creates segregation and discrimination in public school settings along with tainting the mind that one is inferior if they do not adhere to the "majority" in a district, leading to an even further reason to persecute one individual.

    We should not forget the Supreme Court cases of Ed Schempp, Ishmael Jaffree and Vashti McCollum. We should also not forget that silent, individual prayer has never been outlawed in schools, merely the Governments interpretation of what the majority should learn has.

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