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  • Legality is not determined by the government(At least not this blatently)

    Now first off Im not some idiot that believes that the government isnt corrupt, it is and the corperations choose the laws (thats why they exist), but for profit prisons are making a business out of punishment, and a businesses goal is to make money, so as a result these prisons goals will be to gain more prisoners, which means they are going to arrest people for longer and for more bullshit charges. It's a government job, and prison is a punishment, so the government should be punishing its citizens, not fat man business over here.

  • What are we going to do with existing prisoners?

    If we shut down the private, for-profit, prisons where are we going to house the existing criminals? We can't let them out onto the streets. For-profit prisons are cheaper because tax payers don't have to pay for the prisons. IF the government shut down the private prisons it would still take them time and a lot of money to build new prisons and hire guards. The risks transporting all of them..? The list is endless. We are now dependent on these prisons closing them would prove to be disastrous.

  • Where's the Accountability?

    Private prisons should be banned because there is less accountability than in state-run facilities. Who audits these private prisons? How do we know each jailer is trained properly? How do we know whether or not the employees follow the law with respect to the prisoners? There is too much room for snafus and loopholes with a private prison.

  • Private Prisons Cost More Than Public Prisons

    • Private Prisons cause a bigger debt for the state. For example, Montgomery County decided to construct the Joe Corley Detention Facility, operated by The Geo Group. The private prison took $45 million dollars in bond to construct. It has left the county with a large financial burden also. Even though the facility opened in August 2008 there are no inmates in the prison. Unfortunately for the county, according to County Judge Alan B. Sadler, "did not anticipate" the potential loss of its tax-exempt status. According to Sadler, if the country loses its tax-exempt status "the tax implications would be huge."
    • Instead of the United States money going to education and to make the society better it goes to Private Prisons. For example, The special education system in the United States is one of the most heavily-regulated and under-funded of all federal education mandates. And there is not nearly enough funding for these children that need it the most. In order to have good teachers who care about their students there needs to be more funding put into special needs of education, but instead the money is being used for funding Private Prisons.

  • A Conflict of Interest

    Private prisons have a fundamental conflict of interest. The goal of the justice system is of course to reduce crime. But private prisons benefit from having as much crime as possible. How can they be trusted to provide any sort of rehabilitation when doing so hurts their own business model?

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  • If no private prison what will we do with prisoners

    I believe that if we do no have private prisons that we wont have anywhere to put our prisoners and we don't want to put them in our public prisons that don't take care of them and don't care about the prisoners. That is why I do not think that we should ban them.

  • Problems not intrinsic to private prisons, Reform is the solution not abolition

    Overseeing prison operations to ensure humane prisoner treatment is a difficult task for both government-run and private facilities. The government are the ones untimely controlling the private prisons threw there contracts, by implementing more transparency in the operation of the private prisons, and strengthening the current public records laws, are the only reasonable solution. Abolition is not the solution, the solution is reform!

  • If no private prison what will we do with prisoners

    I believe that if we do no have private prisons that we wont have anywhere to put our prisoners and we don't want to put them in our public prisons that don't take care of them and don't care about the prisoners. That is why I do not think that we should ban them.

  • The government needs these prisons.

    Theres alot of stuff about there being more riots at for profit prisons but private prisoners come from the public prisons and the public sends for profit prisons the difficult prisoners. And if we didnt have these prisons people would be spending half the time they are supposed to in prison because they are so crowded. In 2011 oer 5000 people were released early from the prisons being overcrowded. And why ban these prisons with so much potential we can improve them instead and have a much more balanced jail system.

  • Instead of banning them, we can improve them.

    I understand that private prisons have poor quality, but banning them will solve problems AND create problems at the same time. The main problem with for-profit prisons is that they have poor conditions for the prisoners and horrible quality. But banning them will only bring up the overcrowding issue again. State-run and government-run facilities take nearly 3-4 years to build while a private prison takes onlyan average of 1 year. Where will the prisoners go when private prisons are banned. They can't be allowed to run around committing crimes so instead of banning them we can't simply improve them to meet the standards of that of state-run or government-run facilities.

  • With not private prisons, what will we do?

    As untrustworthy, and slimy their owners are, private prisons have been factored into the equation of where to put our prisoners. If you take those prisons owned by the corporations out, you have an unhealthy excess of prisoners needing containment and beds. So, to sum this question up, we're not going to have anywhere else to put the prisoners, soon.

  • Lets help them!

    Theres alot of stuff about there being more riots at for profit prisons but private prisoners come from the public prisons and the public sends for profit prisons the difficult prisoners. And if we didnt have these prisons people would be spending half the time they are supposed to in prison because they are so crowded. In 2011 oer 5000 people were released early from the prisons being overcrowded. And why ban these prisons with so much potential we can improve them instead and have a much more balanced jail system.

  • With not private prisons, what will we do?

    I believe that if we do no have private prisons that we wont have anywhere to put our prisoners and we don't want to put them in our public prisons that don't take care of them and don't care about the prisoners. That is why I do not think that we should ban them.

  • With not private prisons, what will we do?

    I believe that if we do no have private prisons that we wont have anywhere to put our prisoners and we don't want to put them in our public prisons that don't take care of them and don't care about the prisoners. That is why I do not think that we should ban them.

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