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Should religion be practiced in schools (not religious studies)?

  • Collective Worship provides space for reflection

    This provide pupils with space for reflection. We shouldn't stop practicing Christianity in schools in a Christian country. When people go abroad they want to embrace the culture. So if they went to England they would expect there to be Religious practices in school. Just because there are more immigrants in the country doesn't mean we should stop practicing our religion to fit with there beliefs.

  • Activities Such as Praying Should be Allowed Through Freedom of Religion and Freedom of Speech

    In many schools in cities, a student can be removed from class for wearing a cross or appearing to be praying. Teachers can be punished for mentioning GOD (even if it falls within their subject, such as teaching about the Reformation in World History, or even answering a question that a student asks outside of class). The constitution guarantees freedom of religion, not freedom from religion.

  • Are you Joking?

    It already is. Children can already pray with a group of friends all they want. The restriction is on teachers, who (as representatives of the state) need to make sure that students of all religions aren't discriminated against. To do this, they can't make students pray or worship a God of any kind. It is all about fairness and equality.

  • Not in public schools, it shouldn't.

    Despite the constant insistence by the Christian Right, the United States IS NOT a Christian nation. It is a nation wherein the majority of citizens claim to be Christian on the census. There is a big difference here. There is not one single reference to God in the U.S. Constitution or in any of the Amendments, with the exception of the signature block, which refers to the date as "...The Year of our Lord...". In fact, the only text which references religion limits it. The First Amendment says explicitly, "Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion..." This cautious attitude of the founding fathers toward religion was fairly pervasive. The Treaty of Tripoli, drafted under President George Washington, then later ratified unanimously by the U.S. Senate and signed into law by President John Adams states, "...The Government of the United States is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion..."

    Any practice of religion in public schools is not only strictly unconstitutional, but it is UNAMERICAN as well.


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