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Should religious entities receive tax exempt status?

Asked by: SitaraPorDios
  • All non profits receive tax exemption

    All non profits receive tax exemption status. Luckily the 1st amendment protects religious organizations from the rabid liberal majority in media, Hollywood, and on internet blogs and forums.

    Liberal-think believes that "separation of state" prohibits the government from passing any law that may benefit a religious or religiously-affiliated organization.

    Liberals conveniently forget the 1st amendment that allows religious citizens to vote for religious politicians. Religion does not end in the church, synagogue or mosque. Indeed a religious person is allowed to be religious at work, in the park and most importantly in the voting booth.

  • All non profits receive tax exemption

    All non profits receive tax exemption status. Luckily the 1st amendment protects religious organizations from the rabid liberal majority in media, Hollywood, and on internet blogs and forums.

    Liberal-think believes that "separation of state" prohibits the government from passing any law that may benefit a religious or religiously-affiliated organization.

    Liberals conveniently forget the 1st amendment that allows religious citizens to vote for religious politicians. Religion does not end in the church, synagogue or mosque. Indeed a religious person is allowed to be religious at work, in the park and most importantly in the voting booth.

  • It is necessary for them to receive tax exemptions.

    A religious entity receiving tax exemptions is vital for the capability to coexist spiritually and mentally. If donations were taxed, and property taxes charged like normal estates and business, churches would be forced to close their doors to feeding the needy , holding church services during the week and perhaps occasionally the weekends. A church or any religious entity is the balancing factor in any community / society; it is the changing factor and the fight to eradicate poverty and hunger in that particular area.

  • Most churches are just fronts for ruthless, manipulative crooks to extort tax-free cash from mentally-venerable worshippers.

    You never see a poor pastor in America do you? They all are rolling in money. They live in massive houses and drive flashy cars and own swanky boats. One even claimed he needed his own private jet because “it brings him closer to God”.

    Fair enough, if church-goers are daft enough to fund their pastors’ lavish lifestyles that’s up to them but religious clerics should pay tax on their income just like everybody else.

  • No they should not.

    Governments that extend tax exempt status to religious entities are endorsing religion and the government has no right to endorse or forbid religion. Don't get it twisted: I am not against the existance of religious entities. I just believe in the separation of religion and state. Random word filler here.

  • Only for charitable purposes

    Applying blanket tax exemption to religious institutions gives direct governmental support to those religious institutions, in direct violation of the U.S. Constitution. Furthermore, even under the tax law as it currently exists, religious institutions which are tax exempt are not allowed to offer proclamations on political issues, but most of them do anyway.

    Tax exemption for charitable actions does make some sense, however. To the extent that religious institutions are engaged in legitimate secular charitable work, they should receive tax exemption on that money spend on those projects, just as private citizens do. Otherwise, they should pay taxes just like the rest of us.


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