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Should schools talk more about the issues surrounding suicide, self-harm, eating disorders and other mental health issues?

Asked by: AriaHere
  • Give students more of an understanding.

    At my school, they don't really talk about metal issues that much. For example, most people think Bipolar Disorder is just being happy then mad and people use it as a threat not to mess with them. They don't know the start of it and they self diagnose casually. I have never heard any health teacher talk about eating disorders, suicide, or self-harm. Barely anyone knows the meaning of anxiety and the results of it. They mainly talk about drugs and girls getting pregnant in heath class. The teachers should talk about it more so people don't walk around saying things that they really have no idea about. My school is crappy though so they might talk more about it in other schools.

  • Why is a big problem now!

    I have know many people, including myself who have had deep psychological issues, mental health issues etc. None of them had the chance to talk about it in school so they didn't realize they even had a mental disorder.
    Schools talk enough about bullying affecting mental health. This is not always the case. Individuals who haven't been bullied could be creating a mental health disorder by themselves .

  • Our school talked my ears off.

    I'm not against them talking about it, but I didn't graduate that long ago and I can say with certainty that I heard the issues surrounding suicide, self harm, eating disorders, and mental health issues year after year after year. Health class was my least favorite and I found their messages to be a waste of my time personally. I am however thankful that they were putting them out for the students. My school did a very good job.

  • For sure they shouldn't

    For many students, school can be a very depressing place already and a class about these subject would probably be even more so. Students that may have some degree of depression would likely slip to an even worse state and those at risk of suicide could be triggered by talking about it. If you look in the news about school shootings, you can see how one can inspire others to follow the example so a class about suicide could also make teens consider it as an option.
    A better idea is to make sure teachers are informed about warning signs so they can take appropriate actions. Seeing they are teachers and not psychologists or psychiatrists, they are not qualified to treat students who may have mental health problems but should just alert other school staff or parents about the possible issue so they can determine the best course of action.

  • Make things worse.

    For many students, school can be a very depressing place already and a class about these subject would probably be even more so. Students that may have some degree of depression would likely slip to an even worse state and those at risk of suicide could be triggered by talking about it. If you look in the news about school shootings, you can see how one can inspire others to follow the example so a class about suicide could also make teens consider it as an option.
    A better idea is to make sure teachers are informed about warning signs so they can take appropriate actions. Seeing they are teachers and not psychologists or psychiatrists, they are not qualified to treat students who may have mental health problems but should just alert other school staff or parents about the possible issue so they can determine the best course of action.
    Sure, psychologists or psychiatrists can be helpful to students with these issues but unlike direct treatment, a class about it would likely make things worse and put even more students at risk.


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