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  • Yes it should

    9/11 should be a national holiday because it is not about celebrating what happened but remembering. I was just a few months old. Everyone that remembers, knows the pain, the grieving and the sorrow. No one celebrates 9/11 who is in their right mind. We can't hide what happened in the past, the would make us seem weak but instead we should take the time to remember. Never forget.

  • Yes I agree with having 9/11 being a holiday.

    This day is what changed America into something better, stronger, and smarter. This day can never be forgotten. All the brave men and women that risked there lives to help others. This day is when the United States of American opened their eyes to see what the world really is. This day is very important to every American.

  • Yes it should.

    9/11 should be celebrated as a holiday because it is not about celebrating what happened but remembering and honoring those that have died. September 11th 2001, I was just a few months old. Anyone that remembers what happened on that horrible day remembers the pain, the grieving and the sorrow. You can not celebrate that and no one in their right mind does. We can't hide what happened in the past. 9/11 is about grieving and remembering. Never forget.

  • 9/11 Needs To Be A National Holiday!

    9/11 should be a national holiday, but only for the purpose of remembrance. In less than one-hundred years, there will be no one alive who actually remembers 9/11. At that point, everyone would be learning about what happened through the internet. There would be nobody left who could share their experiences. So why is it a big deal if everyone’s just going to learn about it anyway? Well, eventually, 9/11 will stop being remembered as “The Day America Was Viciously Attacked” and instead might be remembered as “The Day With The Mandatory Moment Of Silence”. Eventually, it might even stop being taught in classrooms all around the country. If that happens, then the stories of all those brave heroes, the first-responders, the fire-fighters, the EMT’s, even the brave people on flight 93 will be forgotten. One of the only ways to prevent this is if we make 9/11 a national holiday. Now some people might argue that we already celebrate too many holidays here in America, but if that’s true, then what’s the point in celebrating the birth of a fictional person (Christmas) or the day with a dark backstory that ended in an unsteadily peaceful feast (Thanksgiving). Honestly, it shouldn’t be an issue if it actually happened, right? Look, my point is this, 9/11 needs to become a national holiday. Once the people who actually remember that day die off, everyone else will eventually stop caring about it. We need to keep this tragedy in the light, rather than cast it aside. It was a tragedy, yes, but it still needs to be remembered and talked about for a while longer, just until the next nation-wide tragedy.

  • 9/11 Needs To Be A National Holiday!

    9/11 should be a national holiday, but only for the purpose of remembrance. In less than one-hundred years, there will be no one alive who actually remembers 9/11. At that point, everyone would be learning about what happened through the internet. There would be nobody left who could share their experiences. So why is it a big deal if everyone’s just going to learn about it anyway? Well, eventually, 9/11 will stop being remembered as “The Day America Was Viciously Attacked” and instead might be remembered as “The Day With The Mandatory Moment Of Silence”. Eventually, it might even stop being taught in classrooms all around the country. If that happens, then the stories of all those brave heroes, the first-responders, the fire-fighters, the EMT’s, even the brave people on flight 93 will be forgotten. One of the only ways to prevent this is if we make 9/11 a national holiday. Now some people might argue that we already celebrate too many holidays here in America, but if that’s true, then what’s the point in celebrating the birth of a fictional person (Christmas) or the day with a dark backstory that ended in an unsteadily peaceful feast (Thanksgiving). Honestly, it shouldn’t be an issue if it actually happened, right? Look, my point is this, 9/11 needs to become a national holiday. Once the people who actually remember that day die off, everyone else will eventually stop caring about it. We need to keep this tragedy in the light, rather than cast it aside. It was a tragedy, yes, but it still needs to be remembered and talked about for a while longer, just until the next nation-wide tragedy.

  • 9/11 Needs To Be A National Holiday!

    9/11 should be a national holiday, but only for the purpose of remembrance. In less than one-hundred years, there will be no one alive who actually remembers 9/11. At that point, everyone would be learning about what happened through the internet. There would be nobody left who could share their experiences. So why is it a big deal if everyone’s just going to learn about it anyway? Well, eventually, 9/11 will stop being remembered as “The Day America Was Viciously Attacked” and instead might be remembered as “The Day With The Mandatory Moment Of Silence”. Eventually, it might even stop being taught in classrooms all around the country. If that happens, then the stories of all those brave heroes, the first-responders, the fire-fighters, the EMT’s, even the brave people on flight 93 will be forgotten. One of the only ways to prevent this is if we make 9/11 a national holiday. Now some people might argue that we already celebrate too many holidays here in America, but if that’s true, then what’s the point in celebrating the birth of a fictional person (Christmas) or the day with a dark backstory that ended in an unsteadily peaceful feast (Thanksgiving). Honestly, it shouldn’t be an issue if it actually happened, right? Look, my point is this, 9/11 needs to become a national holiday. Once the people who actually remember that day die off, everyone else will eventually stop caring about it. We need to keep this tragedy in the light, rather than cast it aside. It was a tragedy, yes, but it still needs to be remembered and talked about for a while longer, just until the next nation-wide tragedy.

  • It Should be considered a holiday

    9/11 should be considered a nation holiday for many reasons. Not only did that date bring the country together, but it made us stronger. 9/11 made people drop feuds and appreciate each other a lot more; not a lot of events can cause that. Since that's rare, it should be celebrated.

  • Yes it should

    9/11 should be a holiday because this is a day where we should apperciate and honor all the lives that we gone on that day . Although , it is a tragic event to look back it is still apart of US history and made a impact on our nation .

  • Yes it should

    This day should be honored , even though its not the best event that happened but it is a memorable day . Also , we should honor the people who died on this day . By making 9/11 a national holiday we are honoring all the lives that died on that day .

  • Yes it should

    This day should be honored , even though its not the best event that happened but it is a memorable day . Also , we should honor the people who died on this day . By making 9/11 a national holiday we are honoring all the lives that died on that day .

  • 9/11 Needs To Be A National Holiday!

    9/11 should be a national holiday, but only for the purpose of remembrance. In less than one-hundred years, there will be no one alive who actually remembers 9/11. At that point, everyone would be learning about what happened through the internet. There would be nobody left who could share their experiences. So why is it a big deal if everyone’s just going to learn about it anyway? Well, eventually, 9/11 will stop being remembered as “The Day America Was Viciously Attacked” and instead might be remembered as “The Day With The Mandatory Moment Of Silence”. Eventually, it might even stop being taught in classrooms all around the country. If that happens, then the stories of all those brave heroes, the first-responders, the fire-fighters, the EMT’s, even the brave people on flight 93 will be forgotten. One of the only ways to prevent this is if we make 9/11 a national holiday. Now some people might argue that we already celebrate too many holidays here in America, but if that’s true, then what’s the point in celebrating the birth of a fictional person (Christmas) or the day with a dark backstory that ended in an unsteadily peaceful feast (Thanksgiving). Honestly, it shouldn’t be an issue if it actually happened, right? Look, my point is this, 9/11 needs to become a national holiday. Once the people who actually remember that day die off, everyone else will eventually stop caring about it. We need to keep this tragedy in the light, rather than cast it aside. It was a tragedy, yes, but it still needs to be remembered and talked about for a while longer, just until the next nation-wide tragedy.

  • September 11th should not be a national holiday.

    Don't we have enough holidays already? When does it end? In one hundred years, there could be so many national holidays that the work week will have to be redefined. Half of the average work week could end up being designated as a national holiday of some sort. We need to be more creative to find ways to recognize events without disrupting the workflow of the nation's commerce.

  • It would glorify the tragedy.

    No, September 11 should not be a national holiday, because that would be giving something to the people who perpetrated the attacks. It also should not be used for political purposes, such as to celebrate socialism by having a national holiday for it. People should remember it, but the government does not need to be glorifying mass murder.

  • No, it is a terrible event among many.

    Generally we do not have national holidays that remember horrific events. And in any case, as horrifying as this day was to most of Americans, we need to understand that many other such events happen around the world each and every day and that someone who loses a loved one suffers just as much no matter where and when it happens.


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