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  • Soldiers Should Always Follow Orders

    Soldiers should always follow the orders of their superiors. The military is built upon order, so this is a basic fact. Without this rule, chaos or uncertainty would be seen throughout the military, and lead to negative affects. Soldiers should follow orders no matter what. If they're wrong, then the commanding officer will have to deal with the consequences.

  • Yes

    Soldiers are obligated to follow the commands of higher authority. They are the one who carries out a plan and mission. Soldiers should always follow the orders because an order ensures proper executions. If soldiers starts disobeying orders then the whole system will break apart and there would be no point of justification.

  • They should because it can lead to death

    They should because it can lead to death and if they don't something could go wrong and it could cause severe injury. They would also have to face severe consequences. They also should because they swear in the oath that they will follow orders to the president and tho the state.

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  • No, an example is Nazi Germany

    A soldier certainly needs to follow orders in almost all occasions because the military depends on a chain of command in which people do what they have been told to do and are expected to do. The smooth running of any military procedure depends on the reliability of others to do their expected role. But a soldier is also an autonomous person. A soldier in an unexpected situation might realize that following an order would lead to bad consequences, perhaps the commander who issued the order did not know of the circumstances that might result and so the soldier might have to reassess the order he was given in the light of the new circumstances. But also, a soldier has the right to not engage in something morally objectionable, whether that objectionable thing was intended or unintended. There were many people in Nazi Germany who after the war said they were "just following orders" and used that explanation to excuse themselves from what took place. A soldier has to follow orders most of the time, but also has to maintain responsibility for his own actions in some circumstances.

  • Bad Leadership Exists

    If a leader tells you to do something that is morally wrong, you have the right to not follow that order. If that Sergeant / Commanding officer yells at your for not following his orders, take it up higher in command and explain that he/she is ordering you to do something morally wrong.

    You have to keep in mind these things:

    • The orders obey the rules of military courtesy and etiquette
    as well as the rules of military law.

    • The orders demonstrate loyalty, self-control, honesty, and
    truthfulness.

    If these things are not demonstrated, the command/order is morally wrong. Always keep this checklist in the back of your head if dealing with an issue.

  • They are independent humans, not drones.

    I quote this sentence from bioshock, "a man chooses, a slave obeys." We are born with free will. To accept this mentality is to reject our own existence. This leads to the suffering innocents. What will men who seperate and destroy families, who kill innocents defending their homes, and subjugate their own people tell you? That they were just following orders. Following orders doesn't always mean it's the morally correct thing to do.

  • No, that's how the Nazis took over.

    Of course if one believes in the ideals of the government one is serving and admires the military higher ups and what they are doing, then order in the military is important. But individual conscience has to always be in play, and one must act on one's convictions if something seems immoral.

  • Order based upon flawed information

    If ordered to fire upon a certain position that you know contains your own troops and is clearly being issued based upon flawed information higher up the chain of command. The man (or woman ) on the ground being in possession of information that his/her superiors do not have must be able to countermand the flawed instruction.

  • Not when they violate your human rights or the rights of others.

    This “soldiers always follow orders” mentality has led to a lot of terrible and embarrassing war crimes in the name of the United States’ military. I can understand being in a life and death situation and needing to do whatever you have to to survive. However, I cannot even begin to comprehend something like torturing or abusing another individual simply because you were told to do so by your superior. In the end, the military is a job. Isn’t your personal dignity and another person’s human rights more important than keeping your job?

  • No

    Since the word 'always' makes this an absolute question, no, soldiers should not always follow the order of their superiors, and indeed are not expected to follow their orders if those orders either violate their rights or are illegal in some other way. Should soldiers follow orders that are legal? Sure, why not?

  • Generally, But Not Always

    Generally soldiers should follow orders. Stopping and thinking "is that tactic/strategy really that good of an idea" can get you and your platoon killed when action must be taken in realtime.
    Still, soldiers take an oath to uphold the Constitution. Anything unconstitutional or in violation of international law must be refused and a good soldier will do this even if the consequence may be a court martial. A good soldier also does not forget he is a human being. "Orders are orders" should not be used as an excuse to violate basic human decency.


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