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  • No to haters

    It is wrong and against humanity to decide people's future on the basis to save guard some other country's interest. It should be the people who live in that area to decide about their future like Somaliland people did back in 2001 when an internationally observed referendum was conducted and an overwhelming 97% decided to seperate from the rest of Somali.

  • No to haters

    It is wrong and against humanity to decide people's future on the basis to save guard some other country's interest. It should be the people who live in that area to decide about their future like Somaliland people did back in 2001 when an internationally observed referendum was conducted and an overwhelming 97% decided to seperate from the rest of Somali.

  • Yes Somaliland should be recognised

    This is Somaliland previous history,

    When the Protectorate of Somaliland became independent as the State of Somaliland on June 26, 1960, it was accorded full recognition of its sovereignty. The UN was informed by the British of the birth of a new nation, and thirty-five UN members, including the US, immediately gave the state full diplomatic recognition. Nevertheless, just 5 days later, the State of Somaliland entered into a union with the newly independent Somalia

    This is how Somali civil war started.
    Therefore, in late May 1988 SNM units moved out of their Ethiopian base camps and launched a major offensive in northern Somalia. The rebels temporarily occupied the provincial capitals of Burao and Hargeysa. These early successes bolstered the SNM's popular support, as thousands of disaffected Isaaq clan members and SNA deserters joined the rebel ranks. Over the next few years, the SNM took control of almost all of northwestern Somalia and extended its area of operations about fifty kilometers east of Erigavo. However, the SNM did not gain control of the region's major cities (i.E., Berbera, Hargeysa, Burao, and Boorama), but succeeded only in laying siege to them. With Ethiopian military assistance no longer a factor, the SNM's success depended on its ability to capture weapons from the SNA. The rebels seized numerous vehicles such as Toyota Land Cruisers from government forces and subsequently equipped them with light and medium weapons such as 12.7mm and 14.5mm machine guns, 106mm recoilless rifles, and BM-21 rocket launchers.
    The SNM possessed antitank weapons such as Soviet B-10 tubes and RPG-7s. For air defense the rebels operated Soviet 30mm and 23mm guns, several dozen Soviet ZU23 2s, and Czech-made twin-mounted 30mm ZU30 2s. The SNM also maintained a small fleet of armed speed boats that operated from Maydh, fifty kilometers northwest of Erigavo, and Xiis, a little west of Maydh. Small arms included 120mm mortars and various assault rifles, such as AK-47s, M-16s, and G-3s. Despite these armaments, rebel operations, especially against the region's major cities, suffered because of an inadequate logistics system and a lack of artillery, mine-clearing equipment, ammunition, and communications gear. To weaken Siad Barre's regime further, the SNM encouraged the formation of other clan-based insurgent movements and provided them with political and military support. In particular, the SNM maintained close relations with the United Somali Congress (USC), which was active in south-central Somalia, and the Somali Patriotic Movement (SPM), which operated in southern Somalia. Both these groups sought to overthrow Siad Barre's regime and establish a democratic form of government

    I hope Somaliland will be recognized soon,
    Viva Somaliland republic.

    Posted by: Jama
  • Yes Somaliland should be independent Country

    Somaliland has been independent before, it used to be British protectorate since 1884 and gained its sovereignty 26th of June 1960. After temporary union failed Somaliland reclaims its Independent 18th of May 1991 after SNM defeated Siyaad Bare regime. Now after 21 years Somalia hasn’t got prober government and Somaliland has an elected president and was peaceful for the last 21 years.

  • Yes, Somaliland should be independent country. Somaliland has been independent before it was British protectorate since 1884 and gained its sovereignty 26th of June 1960.

    Somaliland has been independent before and it used to be a British protectorate since 1884 and gained its sovereignty 26th of June 1960. After temporary union failed Somaliland reclaims its Independent 18th of May 1991 after SNM defeated Siyaad Bare regime. Now after 21 years Somalia hasn’t got prober government and Somaliland has an elected president and was peaceful for the last 21 years.

  • Why would you abandon everything else?

    You can’t just take a large chunk of a country and label it something else. It’s like taking a huge slice of cheese cake later naming it ‘strawberry’ cheesecake. The fact that they slammed 'land' right behind it shows their originality and how much thought actually went in. No matter what you name it, it will still be Somalia and not Somaliland.

    Why? Because it is still Somalia and if Somaliland really wants the independence it craves for it should do it itself. Meaning no interference from other countries.

    A mere border shouldn't stop the ''Somali landers'' from hearing the pain they left behind for others to deal with. They should try to do what they can because they are still Somalian and on the other side there are people just like them if not better because their dealing with the pain and not separating themselves from others just to stay safe.

    ''It is wrong and against humanity to decide people's future on the basis '' is what the proposition said. Then again don't you think that the other Somalians trapped in a war torn country should have a right to say what they want to say since so many of you want to rip their birth place, their origin, apart.

    The separation has already caused so much bloodshed. Somalia itself is only beginning to recover. Why send it back to where it so desperately moved away from? Who knows what might happen if Somaliland does get independence. Clans and ‘qabil’ is what separated Somalia and if Somaliland does get independence it would be likely that other clans would follow in suit and eventually you would end up with a broken and shattered ceramic that once held so much beauty later to be replaced by death, destruction and despair.
    Terrorism. Missing people. Separated families. Starvation. Men, women and children losing their lives. That and many other unspeakable, horrid and unthinkable acts is what the conflict brought leaving only a few alive and to grips with their sanity to tell the story. Shouldn't we give them the vote since they have the ‘hands on experience’?

    Imagine going through all this and managing to escape with your life and find out that the very reason you have suffered. The very reason your family perished. The very reason you sat, days on end, slowly starving was so that one clan could rip apart your homeland and watch from the side-line as they took away the only thing you had that was worth fighting for. Now let me ask you one more question.


    Would you repeat it again?

  • Why would you abandon everything else?

    You can’t just take a large chunk of a country and label it something else. It’s like taking a huge slice of cheese cake later naming it ‘strawberry’ cheesecake. The fact that they slammed 'land' right behind it shows their originality and how much thought actually went in. No matter what you name it, it will still be Somalia and not Somaliland.

    Why? Because it is still Somalia and if Somaliland really wants the independence it craves for it should do it itself. Meaning no interference from other countries.

    A mere border shouldn't stop the ''Somali landers'' from hearing the pain they left behind for others to deal with. They should try to do what they can because they are still Somalian and on the other side there are people just like them if not better because their dealing with the pain and not separating themselves from others just to stay safe.

    ''It is wrong and against humanity to decide people's future on the basis '' is what the proposition said. Then again don't you think that the other Somalians trapped in a war torn country should have a right to say what they want to say since so many of you want to rip their birth place, their origin, apart.
    The separation has already caused so much bloodshed. Somalia itself is only beginning to recover. Why send it back to where it so desperately moved away from? Who knows what might happen if Somaliland does get independence. Clans and ‘qabil’ is what separated Somalia and if Somaliland does get independence it would be likely that other clans would follow in suit and eventually you would end up with a broken and shattered ceramic that once held so much beauty later to be replaced by death, destruction and despair.
    Terrorism. Missing people. Separated families. Starvation. Men, women and children losing their lives. That and many other unspeakable, horrid and unthinkable acts is what the conflict brought leaving only a few alive and to grips with their sanity to tell the story. Shouldn’t we give them the vote since they have the ‘hands on experience’?

    Imagine going through all this and managing to escape with your life and find out that the very reason you have suffered. The very reason your family perished. The very reason you sat, days on end, slowly starving was so that one clan could rip apart your homeland and watch from the side-line as they took away the only thing you had that was worth fighting for. Now let me ask you one more question.

    Would you repeat it again?

  • No It can,t be an independent or recognized

    Somalis and other African nations were living in their lands and were their own masters, the arrival of colonial powers from Europe brought poverty, division and wars to people like me from North of Somalia and others as well in Asia or Africa, colonizers were enriching their countries and impoverishing native people, those of you starting history at the onset of colonial darkness are blind to the great and good history of Somali race and country. The question posed here is utter nonsense at its best, No one on earth can make a case on such a deluded and false premise. Its better to understand how nations come about- religion and commonly forged identity, shared sense of historic values and language in some cases. In this premise nobody identified unique and sensible reason, even the name adopted seems to lack historic value and meaning apart from being a loan from the English language ( Land), those of you trying to create utopian history need to understand nations around the world had civil wars, some wars so devastating that millions of people perished. Presence of Britain as uninvited guest in Somali country -( they kick the door in and insulted us in our backyard ) or those armed by Ethiopia to wage war in Somalia- call them SNM, SSDF or USC are not valid to make a compelling case. Reading through your writings, one can discern lack of objective view of the current socio-political situation of Somali nation and above all even not counting the costs born by Somali nation in terms of loss of life and wealth. My nation today is at the mercy of Ethiopian hegemony while it tears itself apart, If nation have to choose to be master of its own or to be servant to Ethiopia, it looks Somalis of day chose the latter, its a historic mistake that we will never be forgiven for. I believe this platform can be meaningful if we delve deeper into the Somali question of today


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Jama says2013-11-17T22:44:57.387
Somaliland has been independent before, it used to be a British protectorate since 1884 and gained its sovereignty 26th of June 1960. After temporary union between Somaliland and Somalia was failed Somaliland people decided to reclaims their Independent 18th of May 1991. Now after 21 years Somalia hasn’t got prober government and Somaliland has an elected president and was peaceful for the last 21 years.
Jama says2013-11-17T23:20:55.343
Somaliland profile

A breakaway, semi-desert territory on the coast of the Gulf of Aden, Somaliland declared independence after the overthrow of Somali military dictator Siad Barre in 1991.
The move followed a secessionist struggle during which Siad Barre's forces pursued rebel guerrillas in the territory. Tens of thousands of people were killed and towns were flattened.
Though not internationally recognised, Somaliland has a working political system, government institutions, a police force and its own currency. The territory has lobbied hard to win support for its claim to be a sovereign state.
Somaliland has escaped much of the chaos that plagues Somalia
The former British protectorate has also escaped much of the chaos and violence that plague Somalia, although attacks on Western aid workers in 2003 raised fears that Islamic militants in the territory were targeting foreigners.
Although there is a thriving private business sector, poverty and unemployment are widespread. The economy is highly dependent on money sent home by members of the diaspora.
Duties from Berbera, a port used by landlocked Ethiopia, and livestock exports are important sources of revenue.
Embargoes
The latter have been hit by embargoes on exports, imposed by some Gulf countries to inhibit the spread of Rift Valley Fever.
Somaliland is in dispute with the neighbouring autonomous Somali region of Puntland over the Sanaag and Sool areas, some of whose inhabitants owe their allegiance to Puntland.
Somaliland's leaders have distanced themselves from Somalia's central transitional government, set up in 2004 following long-running talks in Kenya, which they see as a threat to Somaliland's autonomy. In June 2012, however, they agreed to talks in London with the Somali government on settling Somaliland's status, under the aegis of Britain, the European Union and Norway.
Somaliland was independent for a few days in 1960, between the end of British colonial rule and its union with the former Italian colony of Somalia. More than 40 years later voters in the territory overwhelmingly backed its self-declared independence in a 2001 referendum.
Somaliland's main export is livestock, with sheep and camels being shipped from Berbera, the country's




Sources BBC
Jama says2013-11-17T23:25:17.673
British Somaliland History
This blog would be used to publish British Somaliland History
Sunday, April 14, 2013
THE INTER-WAR YEARS 1919-39
SOMALILAND

The first campaign to explore the possibility of exploiting air power's reach and power in this manner took place in British Somaliland in the Horn of Africa. A Muslim cleric Mohammed bin Abdullah, colloquially, if inaccurately known as "The Mad Mullah", had proved a thorn in the flesh of the colonial administration for many years and had frustrated repeated attempts to bring law and order to the area. In 1920 his activities had reached such a pitch that the Colonial Office again wished to take military action against him and his large band of armed followers. The British Army estimated that this would require a full scale expeditionary force involving 2 or 3 divisions of troops and attendant bag and baggage at a cost of several million pounds. Trenchard, however, offered to do the job using one squadron of de Havilland DH9s, in collaboration with the local gendarmerie regiment, the Somaliland Camel Corps and a battalion of the King's African Rifles. His offer was accepted and the Squadron of 12 aircraft, to be known as "Z Force" was shipped to the area.


In a matter of weeks, operating in conjunction with the Camel Corps, Z Force successfully bombed and harried the Mullah's forces, driving them from their traditional stone forts. The entire campaign cost in the region of £100,000, and it was said afterwards to be the "cheapest war in history". The political effects for the RAF were out of all proportion to the local impact in Somaliland. The RAF had demonstrated its ability to undertake effective police actions


DH9 Air Ambulance with Z Force British Somaliland 1919
Jama says2013-11-17T23:43:35.710
This is Somaliland previous History,

When the Protectorate of Somaliland became independent as the State of Somaliland on June 26, 1960, it was accorded full recognition of its sovereignty. The UN was informed by the British of the birth of a new nation, and thirty-five UN members, including the US, immediately gave the state full diplomatic recognition. Nevertheless, just 5 days later, the State of Somaliland entered into a union with the newly independent Somalia.

Although at first Somalilanders held great enthusiasm for the union with Somalia, it was not long before many became disillusioned with the Somali Republic. As a result of the haste of their union, upon joining together there were no set agreements between Somaliland and Somalia about how to combine the two countries' institutions. This caused many problems due to the extent of their differences: their government languages were different (English for Somaliland; Italian for Somalia) as well as their forms of administration, educational systems, and legal traditions Although at first Somalilanders held great enthusiasm for the union with Somalia, it was not long before many became disillusioned with the Somali Republic. As a result of the haste of their union, upon joining together there were no set agreements between Somaliland and Somalia about how to combine the two countries' institutions. This caused many problems due to the extent of their differences: their government languages were different (English for Somaliland; Italian for Somalia) as well as their forms of administration, educational systems, and legal traditions.

This is how Somali civil war started.

In late May 1988 SNM units moved out of their Ethiopian base camps and launched a major offensive in northern Somalia. The rebels temporarily occupied the provincial capitals of Burao and Hargeysa. These early successes bolstered the SNM's popular support, as thousands of disaffected Isaaq clan members and SNA deserters joined the rebel ranks. Over the next few years, the SNM took control of almost all of northwestern Somalia and extended its area of operations about fifty kilometers east of Erigavo. However, the SNM did not gain control of the region's major cities (i.E., Berbera, Hargeysa, Burao, and Boorama), but succeeded only in laying siege to them. With Ethiopian military assistance no longer a factor, the SNM's success depended on its ability to capture weapons from the SNA. The rebels seized numerous vehicles such as Toyota Land Cruisers from government forces and subsequently equipped them with light and medium weapons such as 12.7mm and 14.5mm machine guns, 106mm recoilless rifles, and BM-21 rocket launchers.
The SNM possessed antitank weapons such as Soviet B-10 tubes and RPG-7s. For air defense the rebels operated Soviet 30mm and 23mm guns, several dozen Soviet ZU23 2s, and Czech-made twin-mounted 30mm ZU30 2s. The SNM also maintained a small fleet of armed speed boats that operated from Maydh, fifty kilometers northwest of Erigavo, and Xiis, a little west of Maydh. Small arms included 120mm mortars and various assault rifles, such as AK-47s, M-16s, and G-3s. Despite these armaments, rebel operations, especially against the region's major cities, suffered because of an inadequate logistics system and a lack of artillery, mine-clearing equipment, ammunition, and communications gear. To weaken Siad Barre's regime further, the SNM encouraged the formation of other clan-based insurgent movements and provided them with political and military support. In particular, the SNM maintained close relations with the United Somali Congress (USC), which was active in south-central Somalia, and the Somali Patriotic Movement (SPM), which operated in southern Somalia. Both these groups sought to overthrow Siad Barre's regime and establish a democratic form of government

I hope Somaliland will be recognized soon,
Viva Somaliland republic.