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Should students be admitted into college based on income and not race?

  • Race is an issue of the past

    These days everyone has opportunities and no one is meant to be denied something due to their race. There are many privileged people within minority races and it is also true that people from so-called 'advantaged' races are not necessarily that well off financially. A much better indication of hardships faced and overcome in order to get an education is income.

  • Race shouldn't determine your worth of being accepted into a college.

    The individual shouldn't be judged by his or her ethnicity for approval but rather on what he or she accomplished and can put forth. We should be spreading tolerance and accept each and every race as equal. We are all humans and each of us has different personalities, histories, views, etc. On the other hand, if it is a college specifically for the particular race to learn of their own culture and history then I am fine with that. It would be much like a Christian or Catholic school, but focusing on the ethnicity’s history. Over all, if the college isn’t a specific school for a particular ethnic group to learn their own culture, the college shouldn’t be determining the person’s right to enter by his or her race.

  • It is completely unfair

    It is unfair because we as a society need to learn to ignore race. If you want a school for just that culture, do it young so they can learn their culture and that can give them more of an identity for themselves. When they get older, they can go and see other people and learn about others after they have a sense of identity for themselves. Let them as a young person learn who they are and get the identity of their culture and native language then come back and share it with others as an adult.

  • The point of equal opportunity.

    The idea behind setting slots for certain ethnic groups, is they have a history of oppression, thus their family standing is likely lower, and therefore even if they are as good as another student their academics suffered. However colleges filling those slots may fill them with say a new immigrant; instead of someone who this country set at a disadvantage.

    By switching the college focus on equal opportunity to parental income, it would be far closer to a level playing field; while ethnic minorities would be very likely to get the slots if their parents failed to climb out of the hole. Yet anyone whose parents fell into the hole, would have the chance of the helping hand regardless of their skin color.

  • Race shouldn't matter

    America is Obsessed with Race, where I come from we don't believe in such nonsense, Income and GPA along with other credentials should determine who gets into what college, however those with low income should not be held at the same expectations with those whose family are not low income

  • If it was based on income more people would be in more debt

    Besides, basing it on income does not help the more unfortunate people out there. I like the idea of earning scholarships because you get paid to do what your good at. You think more of the potential of what something may become and not the consequences on debt.
    I can understand why education may be expensive. To make it based on income it is out of reach and possibly a consequence to society.

  • It really depends.

    In some cases people really face adversity because they are a minority. I do believe that economic standing should be factored in too. I know people that are about a quarter of one race or ethnicity who do not look it, are not in touch with this culture or race or face any adversity from it whatsoever. They simply use it to try to get into other colleges. If you are a minority in a racist area, you might need the extra help of the race card to even the playing field. But in a rich suburb in the Northeast or California, come on. There are some people who really need it, but I believe they should need to prove that they faced adversity because of it.


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