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Should students be allowed to listen to music during exams?

  • Yes i suport

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  • Give students the proper tools to excel

    Bob likes to mine with a pic axe; Bill likes to dig with a shovel. They're both phenomenal workers, they're just inspired differently.

    Growing up I wish people had paid more attention to this EXACT issue. I knew I was smart but when it came to long tests (SATs, LSAT, etc) I would fail...Miserably. It wasn't until later in life I learned that music gave me the outlet to focus. I am ill equipped to focus that long in silence. And for that, there's a series of opportunities (i.E. Schools, internships, etc) I feel I missed because I didn't perform, in some areas, like I could have, had I been given the right tools to work with.

    Be fair in education.

  • This why they should

    ,Music has been shown to help kids with ADD/ADHARA to concentrate better on the work that is in front of them and keeping their minds off distractions.People it helps them with focusing, memorizing, and keeping on task Statics show that 79% of students/workers listen to music while they are doing their job so that they can improve their productivity by keeping them focused on their job.Music is shown to help you focus. Music keeps the environment you are working in quieter because if everyone is listening to music they won't have time to talk to one another and create distractions.

  • This why they should

    ,Music has been shown to help kids with ADD/ADHARA to concentrate better on the work that is in front of them and keeping their minds off distractions.People it helps them with focusing, memorizing, and keeping on task Statics show that 79% of students/workers listen to music while they are doing their job so that they can improve their productivity by keeping them focused on their job.Music is shown to help you focus. Music keeps the environment you are working in quieter because if everyone is listening to music they won't have time to talk to one another and create distractions.

  • ABSOLUTELY, music is just like a good breakfast!

    Science has proven that music engages the motor skills in the brain, this could not even compare to cheating. It is like saying a freshly sharpened pencil, or favorite pen is cheating because it makes a child write faster. Music makes the brain think faster, just has a nice point on a yellow pencil makes a student write faster.

  • Music focuses the mind.

    According to research by Chris Boyd Brewer at the John Hopkins School of Education in Baltimore, USA :

    "Music helps us learn because it will--

    establish a positive learning state
    create a desired atmosphere
    build a sense of anticipation
    energize learning activities
    change brain wave states
    focus concentration
    increase attention
    improve memory
    facilitate a multisensory learning experience
    release tension
    enhance imagination
    align groups
    develop rapport
    provide inspiration and motivation
    add an element of fun
    accentuate theme-oriented units"

    These conclusions apply just as much in the exam room as in the classroom.

  • Actually, Yes and No.

    It depends on what type of music is played during the class and what behavior the students have overall in a classroom. Some argued that classical music can help relax the minds of other people while other genres can provide such distraction and wild happiness combined. However there is nothing wrong should the teacher have good monitoring skills .

  • Music helps u focus

    79% of students/workers to better at there job or test listening to music. And also it help ADD/ADHD kids work better. Also if everyone is listening to music it will stop them from talking to one another. It also is shown to help people focus and let stress of the minds

  • Absolutely. Support science not truthiness

    Merriam-Webster defines truthiness as "the quality of preferring concepts or facts one wishes to be true, rather than concepts or facts known to be true" or as Colbert put it, "truth that comes from the gut, not books." Just because you want to believe that music in the classroom and during testing is a bad idea does not make it true. Many, and I stress many, research articles have been published in journals the world over that support the idea of music playing a critical role in retention, decrease in hyperactivity, increases in attentiveness, increases in clarity and abstract concept perception/understanding, decrease in learning error, and making better use of both cerebral hemispheres in the learning activity. Imagine children with ADHD being able to concentrate better or college students NOT falling asleep in an early morning class or class they are disinterested in. Now combine that with the effect of state-dependent-learning. Play the same music during a test as you did during a lecture and students will have much better recall, even send them home with the playlist from class to study to. While some may decry this as "cheating" or some sort of negligent study aid that won't permit students to fully retain the material, I must disagree. For you teachers and professors out there, how many of your students go home and pop Adderall to focus better even though it wasn't prescribed? They may very well even take it prior to class or before an exam. I knew several people in high school and college who depended on this methodology to facilitate enhanced learning. Would you rather your students turn to academic doping, or simply listen to some good music? Cliffnotes have existed for a long time as a summary study-aid. Would you have them banned too? ANYTHING that facilitates learning without inherent negative side-effect should be utilized fully. Learning; educating oneself is the most pure and laudible of pursuits. The betterment of the mind should never be impeded. As an aspiring university professor in his senior year of a Speech/Hearing Sciences degree I have every intention of using music in my classroom. I have a hypothesis regarding how music can be incorporated into the classroom but I am saving that for a research paper I plan on trying to have published next semester in grad school with cooperation from a professor in my depatment, so you'll have to wait for the data. In the meantime, here are a combination of evidence-based and anecdotal articles for your reading pleasure to further support the cause of music in education.

    Http://www.Howtolearn.Com/products/mozart-effect/
    http://www.Naset.Org/3398.0.Html
    http://neuronetlearning.Com/blog/using-music-to-teach-vocabulary-improves-attitude-and-retention/
    http://www.Cerebromente.Org.Br/n15/mente/musica.Html

  • Yes they should.

    As long as the teacher is positive the music does not somehow have answers hidden in it or is used as a means to cheat somehow than why not. Some people actually test better with the music, and classical music has been said to improve a persons intelligence and help them learn better.

  • Whatever next? Being able to 'phone a friend to reduce stress?

    So when they attend a job interview are they going to be expecting to be listening to music while a potential employer attempts to ask them questions? Most, if not all, employers I can think of would take an extremely dim view of an interviewee sitting in an interview with earphones in each ear. If we didn't have this modern technology would we have to provide separate rooms with a radio or record player playing music? Now driving examiners are being told that they have to allow candidates to have the car-radio on while taking a driving test. When will this 'pandering' end? There is a 'real World' out here and spending all one's time with an iPod playing in one's ears is not a part of that World. Schooling is supposed to prepare young people for the adult-world. Resorting to listening to music in potentially difficult situations is NOT a part of the real World.

  • Worst Idea Ever

    I love music. It honestly makes my day time and time again. However, while I personally would enjoy listening to music during a test, it's simply not fair. Opens a huge door for cheating. Simply by recording myself reading facts related to the exam aloud, I could be given a huge advantage.

  • Hard to focus

    If students are listening to music with a lot of lyrics than it will impair their comprehension . That is when silly mistakes like ignoring directions or misreading take place. If it were soothing music with out vocals then I would lean to yes. How many kids do you know that listen to classical music though?

  • Yes, but no.

    The answer to the question is yes. They should be "allowed" to listen to "music"... But no that's realistically not happening. Maybe if they ever decide they're going to spend money buying ipods and filling them up with pre-approved songs or something. Can you listen to the periodic table song while taking the periodic table test? Realistically, it's a waste of time for teachers to monitor all that and ensure no cheating so... No that's not happening.


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