Amazon.com Widgets
  • Y no k

    Y not y d u always c me as a bad infukence on u child cuz me no smart as u child? If u think dat me no b friends wit u child no mo so by by u child hav no friend no mo so ha hah ha and ha. ( I apologize for the inconvenience, grammatical and spelling errors in the paragraph. I was attempting the reach the 50 word total.)

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  • Yes every school should group by ability

    Higher level students get bored because they already know what is being taught. Yes the student can help a lower level student but then the higher student isn't getting the proper challenges or education fitted for them. The higher level student comes to be a student not a teacher. Yes students should be grouped by ability.

  • Students of higher ability fall behind if they aren't in academic groups.

    Person A gets A* in most of his tests, while Person B, C and D all receive C in their tests. The teacher makes progress slower so that person B, C and D can get higher grades in the test, however, person A is now only getting B grade in their test. With academic groups, Person A would be with people of his own ability and therefore both groups of students would improve their grades.

  • Disengaged kids don't pay attention.

    When a child is bored with the subject (already knows it) or a child doesn't understand the material being taught (doesn't get it), they disengage. When you have disengaged children in a classroom they tend to act out in ways that are disruptive, so that even the children who are in the middle of the spectrum do not get effective learning. The activity that goes on around them is distracting. Teachers cannot effectively keep them all engaged when children in the classroom run the gamut from a child that doesn't know how to sound out multi-syllabic words to one that is reading at college level.

  • Integration is ruining learning

    These days the big word is integration, everyone is supposed to be in the same classes learning the same things regardless of ability, to be fair and equal. Yet the highly intelligent kids are learning nothing and the ones who are struggling are also learning nothing.

    If classes were grouped on a ability we would have less disruptive behaviour from intelligent kids who are just totally bored. And those who are struggling would get the help that they need.

  • Of course students should be grouped by ability.

    Let us think of it like this. There is a kid who should be in functions of Math 1 and a child that should be in trigonometry. If you put the trigonometry student in the same class as the other student then the Trig student will be pulled back and will never find his true potential.

  • Yes, sure they should be grouped according to academic ability.

    I had never thought of such an idea before, but now that I read this question, I think that it is a very good idea to group students in school by their academic ability. That way the less smart ones in the class can't drag down their better peers they work with.

  • Challenged students perform better.

    If a student is stuck in a class with people below his or her ability, their intelligence will stagnate. They won't use their entire potential. Likewise, if a student is stuck in a class with people above his or her ability, they will be lost and confused, and likely fall even further behind.

  • No, students should not be grouped by academic ability.

    No, I do not believe that students should be grouped by academic ability. Instead all students should have an equal opportunity to learn the same content at the same time. Grouping students so that they are all mixed in will also create competition for students, which I believe is important in the learning processes.

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  • Just some links:

    http://www.gifted.uconn.edu/nrcgt/
    http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED355296
    http://www.Ascd.Org/ASCD/pdf/journals/ed_lead/el_199004_braddock.Pdf
    http://www.Nea.Org/tools/16899.Htm]/==

    Here are some links to help decide. I go towards the no side, mainly because the lower students have someone close to their level to work up to. It makes them feel challenged, and like most kids they want to win. For the higher level children, it makes them work harder to keep the level, maybe even make them beat the level they were at before. IT MAKES THEM FEEL CHALLENGED.

  • Just some links:

    http://www.gifted.uconn.edu/nrcgt/
    http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED355296
    http://www.Ascd.Org/ASCD/pdf/journals/ed_lead/el_199004_braddock.Pdf
    http://www.Nea.Org/tools/16899.Htm]/==

    Here are some links to help decide. I go towards the no side, mainly because the lower students have someone close to their level to work up to. It makes them feel challenged, and like most kids they want to win. For the higher level children, it makes them work harder to keep the level, maybe even make them beat the level they were at before. IT MAKES THEM FEEL CHALLENGED.


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rainbowland says2013-10-12T02:29:58.110
This is a very tricky question. Both sides have very good arguments.