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  • Yes, Germany should reimburse.

    Sweden should be reimbursed for the effects of Chernobyl. Any time something catastrophic occurs and was designed to cause the very damage that transpires, the people who suffered deserve retribution. The effects of the disaster are still felt three decades later, and the cancerous outcome is more reason the compensate these families.

  • People in Sweden are still dying from cancer caused by radiation from the Chernobyl accident

    It is now more than two decades since the world's worst nuclear power accident, when a reactor exploded on April 26th 1986 at Chernobyl in the then-Soviet Ukraine. While large tracts of Ukraine, Russia and Belarus were severely contaminated, many parts of Sweden also felt the effects. People in parts of northern and central Sweden are still dying from cancer caused by radiation from the Chernobyl accident. Radiation from Chernobyl has been cited as a factor in more than 1,000 cancer deaths in Norrland between 1986 and 1999 - this in an area with a population of around one million. Experts warn that the worst is yet to come. For these reasons, I would argue that Sweden should be reimbursed for the effects of Chernobyl.

  • Of course they should.

    There were some major effects felt, and it is easy to see what is responsible. The offending party should be forced to make reparations. It's only fair. The amount would be open to debate, but it should at least cover the damages. It's hard to codify the human damage, however.

  • Reimburse Sweden for after effects of the Chernobyl Catastrophe

    The effects of the Chernobyl accident were many and wide-spread. The people of many countries were impacted by the radioactive fallout with both short-term and long-term effects. That these people had no control over the safety conditions at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, they shouldn't have to pay the price of the mistakes and mis-steps of others. If corporations and countries are not held accountable for their own actions, what hope does anyone have of avoiding horrific future accidents?

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