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  • Candy as a reward?

    Teachers should be allowed to give candy as a reward. I say this because this might be the only chance to get a troublemaker/slacker to stop making trouble and raise his hand. If he raises his hand and gets the answers to the questions, and gets rewarded for it, it may be enough to get him to improve his grades.

  • Candy as a reward?

    Teachers should be allowed to give candy as a reward. I say this because this might be the only chance to get a troublemaker/slacker to stop making trouble and raise his hand. If he raises his hand and gets the answers to the questions, and gets rewarded for it, it may be enough to get him to improve his grades.

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  • Yes, I think teachers should use candy as a reward

    Yes, I think teachers should use candy as a reward. I think giving students positive reinforcement when they give a correct answer or demonstrate a correct behavior can really help them develop because they will associate hard work and effort with positive rewards, I think this benefits everybody involved with it and I see no problem with teachers using candy as a reward.

  • Yes, I think teachers should use candy as a reward

    Yes, I think teachers should use candy as a reward. I think giving students positive reinforcement when they give a correct answer or demonstrate a correct behavior can really help them develop because they will associate hard work and effort with positive rewards, I think this benefits everybody involved with it and I see no problem with teachers using candy as a reward.

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  • Sugar is Unhealthy, Especially from a Young Age

    For decades teachers have been handing out lollies and other sweet foods as rewards for good behaviour in the class room. They have rewarded kids for getting assignments in on time, for studying well, for being helpful… The list goes on and on.
    Kids are getting more and more used to being rewarded with sweets, but its having negative effects on their health. Obesity rates have soared in the U.S. over the last fifty years, diabetes is becoming a massive issue and the number of heart disease cases per year has risen. (Ariana Cha, October 30, 2015, stuff.Co.Nz)
    In addition, the consumption of fructose causes cortisol elevation. “Cortisol is a stress hormone and usually only spikes in order to prepare us for a fight (or for running away). It depresses all non-essential functions so the body can focus on the immediate priority of staying alive.” (David Gillespie, “The Sweet Poison Quit Plan”, published 2010).
    Among the “non-essential functions” mentioned are the immune system and concentration.
    With your body focussing to stay alive you are more likely to contract diseases usually repelled by your immune system. Additionally, you are going to find it harder to concentrate on things like studying. So while teachers are rewarding kids for good behaviour, they are actually making teaching more difficult for themselves by providing a substance that has negative effects on concentration of their students.
    Processed fructose are highly addictive, on a level similar to nicotine and cocaine (Kyrsty Hazell, “Sugary Foods Are As Addictive As Cocaine And Nicotine”, The Huffington Post UK).
    That makes sugar a big issue by itself, an unhealthy, addictive substance, masked in so many of the products stocked on the shelves of our supermarkets today.
    In fact, its masked so well that in a recent survey in America, two out of three people underestimated how much sugar was in the contents of popular foods such as cereal and bread.
    Because sugar is so addictive, and because students are being fed so much of it, it often means that there are times when the lack of sugar causes behavioral issues in the class room.
    Along with being addictive, sugar elevates blood triglyceride levels. “When consumed, fructose is immediately converted to circulating fatty acids (triglycerides). This results in a blunting of our appetite control system by rendering us resistant to signals from insulin and leptin (the hormones which tell us when we’ve had enough to eat)” (Gillespie).
    This means we can comfortably consume more calories than our body needs, and then those extra calories get converted into fat.
    If kids are being rewarded (and consuming) sweets, they increase the risk of depression, anxiety, and even dementia. “Consuming fructose leads to type 2 diabetes and a permanently elevated blood sugar level. Consistently high blood sugar provides a perfect environment for cancer growth and is associated strongly with depression, anxiety and dementia. Fructose also causes sustained increases in LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol levels, leading to increased risk of heart disease and stroke” (Gillespie).

  • Sugar is as Addictive as Nicotine and Cocaine

    For decades teachers have been handing out lollies and other sweet foods as rewards for good behaviour in the class room. They have rewarded kids for getting assignments in on time, for studying well, for being helpful… The list goes on and on.
    Kids are getting more and more used to being rewarded with sweets, but its having negative effects on their health. Obesity rates have soared in the U.S. over the last fifty years, diabetes is becoming a massive issue and the number of heart disease cases per year has risen. (Ariana Cha, October 30, 2015, stuff.Co.Nz)
    In addition, the consumption of fructose causes cortisol elevation. “Cortisol is a stress hormone and usually only spikes in order to prepare us for a fight (or for running away). It depresses all non-essential functions so the body can focus on the immediate priority of staying alive.” (David Gillespie, “The Sweet Poison Quit Plan”, published 2010).
    Among the “non-essential functions” mentioned are the immune system and concentration.
    With your body focussing to stay alive you are more likely to contract diseases usually repelled by your immune system. Additionally, you are going to find it harder to concentrate on things like studying. So while teachers are rewarding kids for good behaviour, they are actually making teaching more difficult for themselves by providing a substance that has negative effects on concentration of their students.
    Processed fructose are highly addictive, on a level similar to nicotine and cocaine (Kyrsty Hazell, “Sugary Foods Are As Addictive As Cocaine And Nicotine”, The Huffington Post UK).
    That makes sugar a big issue by itself, an unhealthy, addictive substance, masked in so many of the products stocked on the shelves of our supermarkets today.
    In fact, its masked so well that in a recent survey in America, two out of three people underestimated how much sugar was in the contents of popular foods such as cereal and bread.
    Because sugar is so addictive, and because students are being fed so much of it, it often means that there are times when the lack of sugar causes behavioral issues in the class room.
    Along with being addictive, sugar elevates blood triglyceride levels. “When consumed, fructose is immediately converted to circulating fatty acids (triglycerides). This results in a blunting of our appetite control system by rendering us resistant to signals from insulin and leptin (the hormones which tell us when we’ve had enough to eat)” (Gillespie).
    This means we can comfortably consume more calories than our body needs, and then those extra calories get converted into fat.
    If kids are being rewarded (and consuming) sweets, they increase the risk of depression, anxiety, and even dementia. “Consuming fructose leads to type 2 diabetes and a permanently elevated blood sugar level. Consistently high blood sugar provides a perfect environment for cancer growth and is associated strongly with depression, anxiety and dementia. Fructose also causes sustained increases in LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol levels, leading to increased risk of heart disease and stroke” (Gillespie).

  • No you should not west your money

    You wont get your full pay check if you keep wasting your money on kids for something they should do with out candy or any rewords that kids could do. So don't keep wasting money and time use disciple on kids in stead of bend nice all the time they are not goanna get rewords in life

  • I think teachers should not be able to give candy as a reward

    Why I think that is because at least 30%of kids in the world either
    have allergies or might get diabetes. Even thought it is just a little candy kids could get cavities and then there dentists have to fill them.
    Maybe parents don`t let there kids have candy at all. Why shall teachers give it out well according to me it should not be given out
    as a reward it is tough not have or get it but some kids don`t. In conclusion I think teachers should not give out candy

  • My opinion as a KId

    Kids may like candy but it is not good for them. As a kid I am saying that I would much rather have something that helps me work towards an achievement. At my school if we are good we get a certificate that's helps us work towards a badge. Another thing is that the lollies can rot our teeth and cause you parents to pay money for fillings so I say no to candy in schools.

  • My opinion as a KId

    Kids may like candy but it is not good for them. As a kid I am saying that I would much rather have something that helps me work towards an achievement. At my school if we are good we get a certificate that's helps us work towards a badge. Another thing is that the lollies can rot our teeth and cause you parents to pay money for fillings so I say no to candy in schools.

  • My opinion as a KId

    Kids may like candy but it is not good for them. As a kid I am saying that I would much rather have something that helps me work towards an achievement. At my school if we are good we get a certificate that's helps us work towards a badge. Another thing is that the lollies can rot our teeth and cause you parents to pay money for fillings so I say no to candy in schools.

  • My opinion as a KId

    Kids may like candy but it is not good for them. As a kid I am saying that I would much rather have something that helps me work towards an achievement. At my school if we are good we get a certificate that's helps us work towards a badge. Another thing is that the lollies can rot our teeth and cause you parents to pay money for fillings so I say no to candy in schools.

  • My opinion as a KId

    Kids may like candy but it is not good for them. As a kid I am saying that I would much rather have something that helps me work towards an achievement. At my school if we are good we get a certificate that's helps us work towards a badge. Another thing is that the lollies can rot our teeth and cause you parents to pay money for fillings so I say no to candy in schools.

  • My opinion as a KId

    Kids may like candy but it is not good for them. As a kid I am saying that I would much rather have something that helps me work towards an achievement. At my school if we are good we get a certificate that's helps us work towards a badge. Another thing is that the lollies can rot our teeth and cause you parents to pay money for fillings so I say no to candy in schools.


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