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Should the ban on exploiting the resources of the Antarctic be uplifted?

  • Yees you peasants.

    Well basically i have this friend called Esme and she REALLY likes penguins so i kidnapped one and put it in a box and then shipped it to her house and it started running round and slapping everyone with its flippers and then it ate her hamster and she was well sad so if we kill all the penguins then Esme will probs kill herself. Cheers, bye.

  • I hate life

    Antarctica (US English Listeni/æntˈɑːrktɪkə/, UK English /ænˈtɑːktɪkə/ or /ænˈtɑːtɪkə/ or /ænˈɑːtɪkə/)[Note 1] is Earth's southernmost continent, containing the geographic South Pole. It is situated in the Antarctic region of the Southern Hemisphere, almost entirely south of the Antarctic Circle, and is surrounded by the Southern Ocean. At 14,000,000 square kilometres (5,400,000 square miles), it is the fifth-largest continent in area after Asia, Africa, North America, and South America. For comparison, Antarctica is nearly twice the size of Australia. About 98% of Antarctica is covered by ice that averages 1.9 km (1.2 mi; 6,200 ft) in thickness,[6] which extends to all but the northernmost reaches of the Antarctic Peninsula.

    Antarctica, on average, is the coldest, driest, and windiest continent, and has the highest average elevation of all the continents.[7] Antarctica is considered a desert, with annual precipitation of only 200 mm (8 in) along the coast and far less inland.[8] The temperature in Antarctica has reached −89.2 °C (−128.6 °F), though the average for the third quarter (the coldest part of the year) is −63 °C (−81 °F). There are no permanent human residents, but anywhere from 1,000 to 5,000 people reside throughout the year at the research stations scattered across the continent. Organisms native to Antarctica include many types of algae, bacteria, fungi, plants, protista, and certain animals, such as mites, nematodes, penguins, seals and tardigrades. Vegetation, where it occurs, is tundra.

    Although myths and speculation about a Terra Australis ("Southern Land") date back to antiquity, Antarctica was only first sighted in 1820, by the Russian expedition of Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen and Mikhail Lazarev on Vostok and Mirny, who sighted the Fimbul ice shelf. The continent, however, remained largely neglected for the rest of the 19th century because of its hostile environment, lack of resources, and isolation.

    Antarctica is a de facto condominium, governed by parties to the Antarctic Treaty System that have consulting status. Twelve countries signed the Antarctic Treaty in 1959, and thirty-eight have signed it since then. The treaty prohibits military activities and mineral mining, prohibits nuclear explosions and nuclear waste disposal, supports scientific research, and protects the continent's ecozone. Ongoing experiments are conducted by more than 4,000 scientists from many nations.

  • Kill the animals

    Antarctica (US English Listeni/æntˈɑːrktɪkə/, UK English /ænˈtɑːktɪkə/ or /ænˈtɑːtɪkə/ or /ænˈɑːtɪkə/)[Note 1] is Earth's southernmost continent, containing the geographic South Pole. It is situated in the Antarctic region of the Southern Hemisphere, almost entirely south of the Antarctic Circle, and is surrounded by the Southern Ocean. At 14,000,000 square kilometres (5,400,000 square miles), it is the fifth-largest continent in area after Asia, Africa, North America, and South America. For comparison, Antarctica is nearly twice the size of Australia. About 98% of Antarctica is covered by ice that averages 1.9 km (1.2 mi; 6,200 ft) in thickness,[6] which extends to all but the northernmost reaches of the Antarctic Peninsula.

    Antarctica, on average, is the coldest, driest, and windiest continent, and has the highest average elevation of all the continents.[7] Antarctica is considered a desert, with annual precipitation of only 200 mm (8 in) along the coast and far less inland.[8] The temperature in Antarctica has reached −89.2 °C (−128.6 °F), though the average for the third quarter (the coldest part of the year) is −63 °C (−81 °F). There are no permanent human residents, but anywhere from 1,000 to 5,000 people reside throughout the year at the research stations scattered across the continent. Organisms native to Antarctica include many types of algae, bacteria, fungi, plants, protista, and certain animals, such as mites, nematodes, penguins, seals and tardigrades. Vegetation, where it occurs, is tundra.

    Although myths and speculation about a Terra Australis ("Southern Land") date back to antiquity, Antarctica was only first sighted in 1820, by the Russian expedition of Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen and Mikhail Lazarev on Vostok and Mirny, who sighted the Fimbul ice shelf. The continent, however, remained largely neglected for the rest of the 19th century because of its hostile environment, lack of resources, and isolation.

    Antarctica is a de facto condominium, governed by parties to the Antarctic Treaty System that have consulting status. Twelve countries signed the Antarctic Treaty in 1959, and thirty-eight have signed it since then. The treaty prohibits military activities and mineral mining, prohibits nuclear explosions and nuclear waste disposal, supports scientific research, and protects the continent's ecozone. Ongoing experiments are conducted by more than 4,000 scientists from many nations. This is how it should be!!

  • Must have supplies!!!

    We should be able to exploit this place and take the continent supplies to help us develop our countries. I dont care if animals die we are more important than them and they may look good but without them nobody cares!! We shall have antartica and its mighty supplies! YES

  • Everyone can die!

    People who are taking resources doesn't seem to know that it is dangerous for them as well as for animals. Every year thousand of animals die because their environment is ruining. In some years there might be very serious affects, which can affect out planet. Like global warming or even earthquake.

  • Everyone can die!

    People who are taking resources doesn't seem to know that it is dangerous for them as well as for animals. Every year thousand of animals die because their environment is ruining. In some years there might be very serious affects, which can affect out planet. Like global warming or even earthquake.

  • Ban on resources in Antarctica should be banned for life

    Because there going to be no more oil left for us because were are taking more than we need There are many areas of the world that have already been ravished by the hunt for resources. There is no need to take the risk to expose untarnished regions, just to exploit resources that we can find alternatives to. Watchdogs are less capable of keeping an eye on the practices of big companies in such a far away region. This makes it easier for them to break EPA laws without being caught.

  • Yes Yes Yes

    Well first of all the Antarctic is some of the worst climates on Earth. The Tourism is not that good but that doesn't mean people can just invade and start taking the resources away. The main resources in the Antarctic is Diamonds, Oil, and many more. Thank you and I hope this has helped.

  • Better connection among the Asia countries, more resources available to the people

    I believe the exploit of the resources of the Antarctic should be uplifted. This event has begun due to the melting of arctic ice, and a few sea routes had been developed to exploit the resources around the world. First of all, the exploit has created better connection between the Asian countries: China has been communicating with the other East Asian countries, such as Japan and South Korea; they have been sharing the same routes - SSR and NSR. Secondly, the U.S. has been generating electricity as the melting of arctic ice gives away the new lanes. Most people are worried that if this continues, the environment will be damaged; this will increase the global warming problem. However, experiments had been done and it is investigated that it has not been harming the world a lot. I believe the exploiting of the resources in the Antarctic.

  • We won't survive much longer

    As my heading says. If we don't Antarctica's resources and tourist facilities wars may break out. Therefore if we use Antarctica resources to sustain us a little longer, more renewable and alternate ways of making energy will be made. This will cause a much longer life sustainability and I believe this is our new hope of success. Hope my Idea was helpful

  • What will we have left?

    Antarctica should be saved because at later times when we have used the middle east's oil and coal resources, we will need something else. We should save it before we regret it later. Lets plan ahead. If we detect an abundance of minerals inside of the Antarctica will be used up before 5 years. This ban should stay where it is ore what will we have left?

  • No no and no

    All it accomplishes is putting off problems we will still have to solve in a few years, after the resources are exhausted. It doesn't seem to actually solve any problems, it just gives us another excuse to procrastinate. It will also deplete resources future generations might need, and damage the ecosystem which is, essentially, a large life support machine keeping us alive

  • If humans are using resources faster then they can be obtained, why don't they just hurry up and make eco-friendly resources that last

    ThegaXen says that we are using resources faster then we can obtain them. Yes. I agree with that, but if we keep on using non-renewable resources (not-environmentally friendly) resources we will never invent new resources that will be infinite as well as keep the earth clean and green ( well actually help stop global warming.) To do this we need to reach the point where there's no choice but to invent a new infinite resource. But doing so we also need to leave Antarctica as it is, because at the rate global warming is going, its going to melt anyway, without us needing to add to those emissions that is killing it and us.

  • Marie Badaloni

    We are already at a critical turning point for the health of the oceans worldwide which. The gulf is a disaster, there are over 36,000 wells in the gulf alone and some leak year round, many have been capped for years and are not monitored. It's an extremely volatile situation. The big oil in addition to tracking moguls are not accountable for environmental damage. Look at the tar sands in Canada, a forest leveled the size of England and growing. Thousands of kilometers in toxic waste ponds. Where can it go? Who will be responsible for the cleanup? No one! This is what will happen in Alaska, it must be stopped now. I pray everyday for the Arctic to freeze over.

  • NO NO NO

    Of course not, if it was the entire population of fish such as krill would be wiped out and then what would happen to the food chain? The numbers of phytoplankton would increase, and everything else such as Penguins and Seals would decrease. Do we want to wipe out the Antarctic animal population? What use would that be - are we really going to disrespect our planet so much as to entirely WIPE OUT the population of a place like Antarctica.

  • I do not believe the ban on exploiting Antarctic resources should be lifted, in order to preserve the natural beauty of the land.

    Exploiting the natural resources of one of the last true frontiers of the planet is rightly and justly regulated and, as such, it should not be relaxed. As we have seen in other lands, natural resources are often finite. Once Antarctica's admittedly limited resources are spent, what then? The return obviously does not justify the investment, and the natural beauty of the land only serves to reinforce the idea of a ban.

    Posted by: BrownDustin82
  • The Antarctic remains one of the few places on Earth which can be considered "virgin" territory, and it should remain that way.

    The Antarctic, with the exception of scientific research stations, is just about the only part of the planet where there are no oil wells and other signs of development. It should remain that way, so people will be able to show future generations what the planet used to look like. There's no reason why we have to ruin the entire planet in the name of what some might call "progress".

    Posted by: SteinCor
  • Any area on Earth that is already protected should stay that way.

    Corporations, like BP, have repeatedly shown how irresponsible they can be with our environment, and any place on Earth that is currently untouched should be protected at all costs. We don't want these greedy and careless
    multi-billion dollar corporations destroying even more of the planet.

    Posted by: MarsBIue
  • No, the ban should not be lifted, because we need to protect the few pristine pieces of wilderness that still exist.

    There are many areas of the world that have already been ravished by the hunt for resources. There is no need to take the risk to expose untarnished regions, just to exploit resources that we can find alternatives to. Watchdogs are less capable of keeping an eye on the practices of big companies in such a far away region. This makes it easier for them to break EPA laws without being caught.

    Posted by: J Lamb 43
  • The ban on exploiting resources of Antarctica should not be lifted, as it would create a race to claim territory, and it would have potentially negative environmental consequences.

    Lifting the ban on exploiting resources in Antarctica would be a mistake. The first consequence of this would be a race by various nations to claim and assert Antarctic territory. This could lead to numerous conflicts. Furthermore, the development and exploitation of resources could create a negative impact on the arctic environment.

    Posted by: EminentBennett93

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