Amazon.com Widgets

Should the controversial practice of waterboarding be reinstated as an interrogation technique?

  • Yes, waterboarding should be used as an interrogation technique.

    The CIA should reinstate waterboarding as an interrogation technique. Waterboarding is not torture. The practice is controversial to some; however, it does not cause permanent injuries. The CIA needs effective ways to obtain information for suspected terrorist. America should never torture suspected terrorist; however, enhanced interrogation techniques should not be off limits either.

  • No, waterboarding is torture.

    Waterboarding can not only result in physical pain and damage to the lungs and brain, but also severe long-term psychological trauma. It is inhumane to subject anyone to these conditions, and betrays their basic human rights. As a society, we should not accept this or any other form of torture as a technique for interrogation because it is intrinsically wrong to intentionally cause so much physical and mental pain to another person.

  • Waterboarding should not be used

    Waterboarding (a form of water torture which simulates the sensation of drowning) was a common practice during George W. Bush's presidency. Thankfully it is not practiced anymore (at least to the same degree that it was). Waterboarding should not be used as an interrogation technique because of the physical damage a suspect undergoes - making them less likely to reveal information during an interrogation.

  • Waterboarding is torture.

    Not only is waterboarding a violation of human rights, most experts in the field say that wateroarding and other torture methods don't give reliable information to the U.S. military. A prisoner will give information just to end the torture, even if that information is not true. Nonviolent methods are more effective.


Leave a comment...
(Maximum 900 words)
No comments yet.