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Should the Department of Justice be able to force Apple to give them iOS source code?

  • Justice Must Be Served!

    In this situation, I believe that Apple should comply and give the Department of Justice access so that they have a better chance of catching the San Bernardino killer. If they do not, however, there really is no other option than to force the company to grant access. If this is one of the only ways that the killer can be caught, it would be a shame to not have a way to retrieve pertinent records.

  • Justice must be served!

    In this situation, I believe that Apple should comply and give the Department of Justice access so that they have a better chance of catching the San Bernardino killer. If they do not, however, there really is no other option than to force the company to grant access. If this is one of the only ways that the killer can be caught, it would be a shame to not have a way to retrieve pertinent records.

  • Apple wants to secure the data of their customers.

    Apple has the right to refuse to unlock the iPhone. Apple wants to secure the data of their customers. The FBI bought a really good hacker because unlocking an iPhone is really hard because of the encryption Apple created that is mathematically impossible for the company to unlock them for investigators. The FBI doesn't have the right to hack a device without the right of its compony.

  • Nonono nonono nonono

    The DoJ is demanding that Apple create a special version of iOS with removed security features that would permit the FBI to run brute-force passcode attempts on the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone 5c. Meanwhile, President Barack Obama has made public where he stands on the Apple vs. FBI case, which has quickly become a heated national debate. In the court papers, DoJ calls Apple's rhetoric in the San Bernardino standoff as "false" and "corrosive" because the Cupertino firm dared suggest that the FBI's court order could lead to a "police state." Footnote Nine of DoJ's filing reads:

    "For the reasons discussed above, the FBI cannot itself modify the software on the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone without access to the source code and Apple's private electronic signature. The government did not seek to compel Apple to turn those over because it believed such a request would be less palatable to Apple. If Apple would prefer that course, however, that may provide an alternative that requires less labor by Apple programmers."

    As Fortune's Philip-Elmer DeWitt rightfully pointed out, that's a classic police threat. "We can do this [the] easy way or the hard way. Give us the little thing we're asking for -- a way to bypass your security software -- or we'll take [the] whole thing: your crown jewels and the royal seal too," DeWitt wrote. "With Apple's source code, the FBI could, in theory, create its own version of iOS with the security features stripped out. Stamped with Apple's electronic signature, the Bureau's versions of iOS could pass for the real thing," he added.

  • No, I don't think the Department of Justice should e able to force Apple to give them iOS source code.

    No, I don't think the Department of Justice should be able to force Apple to give them iOS source code because it would set a precedent for further privacy invasion in the future. I believe that Apple is right in refusing to unlock the iPhone because they believe that it would jeopardize their brand and also force them to help the government in future cases.

  • We need to stay free

    No, the DOJ should leave Apple alone, because it's important to keep the government out of private businesses. A hallmark of a free society is that the government can't tell its citizens what to do. This is a slippery slope, and next month, the government will decide that a food company needs to make food for government workers. It will never end, and we'll all be subjects of the government. We have to push back to keep ourselves free.

  • No, the Department of Justice should not be allowed to force Apple to give over iOS source code.

    There is a slippery slope to government interference with private innovation. There is no good reason that the DOJ should have unrestricted access to iOS source code. Instead the government organization should be able to collaborate with the corporation in order to devise whatever solution is applicable. Having the source code would seem to conflict with the intellectual property rights of Apple.


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