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  • It absolutely should be raised.

    Why do you think insurance rates go down at age 25, or why people in the U.S. can't rent a car until 25, or even adopt a child until 25. It is because the human brain is not fully developed until that age. People who say it should be lowered are ignorant to the fact that there is actual science to be dealt with here. Why would anyone want to damage their brain even before it has a chance to fully grow? Oh, and for the people who say it is healthy to have a glass of wine (for the antioxidants) or a beer (to help with blood flow) with a meal, why not just buy some acai juice or cranberry juice, or any other healthy drink? It is because those people already have a dependency to alcohol (no matter how little they drink), and not the health benefits supposedly provided.

  • It should be changed!

    I am a 16 year old myself and the amount of teenagers I know who are the same age as me or even younger who go out in the streets and drink is ridiculous! It needs to be stopped or teenagers may go to far and drink themselves to death.

  • Yes!

    Yes I believe the drinking age should be lowered, it is a high responsibility for people to drink and know when they are going too far. Especially when it is a minor that is drinking, they don't know when to stop, they just keep drinking. And minors. 21 and under get drunk over twice as fast as an adult would. Drinking these days have been overdone, and those who say, "yes, the drinking age should be lowered," all of you are just low life drunks who threw your life away a long time ago. Being that the percentage between minors and adults, minors drink a lot more than adults, and because today in this generation, the youth have flourished giving more minors than adults, and most of them are just ruining themselves by drinking, I think if the drinking age is raised even more than it is now, that would make a big difference in tomorrow's youth, and their future would be a lot more satisfying and exciting for themselves.

  • Yes

    I strongly believe the drinking age should be raised. Many of these people who are saying no today, are children and young adults, these are more than adults! Because our youth has flourished, this is leaving our children today, more drunks of tomorrow. We are destroying our lives. What are we going to tell our children, what are they going to tell their's when they find out what our economy has come to?

  • Yes, the drinking age SHOULD be raised

    I think that lowering the drinking age would be medically irresponsible. In our brains, the frontal lobes are essential for functions such as emotional regulation, planning, and organization. They continue to develop through adolescence and young adulthood. Consuming alcohol can interfere with this development and can potentially cause chronic problems such as greater vulnerability to addiction and depression. Also, 18 year-olds are entering a new phase of independence, and due to a lack of maturity, are more likely to get involved in more risky activities such as binge drinking.

  • Yes, it works in the USA.

    The drinking age is 21 in the USA. Our P Platers get off their P Plates at 20 years give or take a year. Why give them a choice, there is so many late night problems with alcohol fueled violence in places like Coolangatta, Byron Bay, Sydney. Raise the drinking age to 21 and like the States, no ID, no entry. There will be a lot less violence and a lot less deaths on the road.

  • Lower the drinking age and see what happens -_-

    Alcohol abuse is already a problem within teenagers. So why make it legal for them to drink. That makes no sense. Teens feel free and capable of everything at their young age even though they are most likely not. At age 18, they are given more freedom at living a complete adult life with the exception of no drinking. From the ages 18-21, I feel it is gives teens the chance to gain experience and maturity living as a responsible, alcohol-free adult. With their newly gained experiences, they will have more effective capabilities of reflecting on what's right or wrong in their life, concerning alcoholism, and how it will affect them on the long run.

  • YES it should be raised

    Raising the drinking age to 21 will reduce consumption amongst young people because it will be harder to buy alcohol. Also, young people are the most likely group to misuse alcohol; e.g. drinking to excess, which causes accidents, death and health problems. If people start drinking later in life, they may be more likely to drink in moderation and not get addicted at an early age.

    This policy doesn’t address the underlying problem of why people want to drink to excess. For that education may be a better solution; education could help to explain the dangers of excess drinking and therefore encourage young people to drink moderation.. However, previous education policies have not seemed to be very effective. Young people don’t want to hear lectures from the government about the dangers of alcohol.

  • YES! Its the science of common sense!

    Two times in a child life, the connections in the frontal lobe of the brain that control common sense are severed. The first time is around the age of two, christened "the Terrible 2s". The other time is broader, ranging from the beginning of puberty to around the age of 25. These connections sever to make room for more connections. This is the very reason why most teenagers have no common sense, they just don't have it! Alcohol consumption during this time is dangerous because it inhibits the growth of these new connections. I once knew a kid whose name was Tod, and he started drinking in the sixth grade, and was into drugs by ninth. This kid was aptly nicknamed "Retod" (say it out loud) because of his stupidity that was cause by underage drinking. He was a very bright boy growing up, and had a lot of potential. He wasted it by drinking underage and destroying his brain. The drinking age, in my opinion, should be raised to at least 25.

  • A very good idea.

    I strongly believe that the drinking age should be raised to 21 as the age of 18 the brain is still developing. Alcohol causes permanent brain damage.
    "Raising the legal age will reduce not only youth alcohol problems but also other forms of drug use" says lead author Professor John Toumbourou of the Deakin University School of psychology. Rising the legal age limit will send a public message that alcohol is a neurotoxin for youth.

    There is too much scientific evidence supporting rising the drinking age to ignore. The human brain is not fully developed until age 25, and having young people getting drunk at 18 is killing vital brain cells that could even cause brain damage. When America rose their drinking age, the number of fatalities on their roads and alcohol related violence dropped dramatically. It's not just the drunk drivers who die; it's also the innocent people they crash into. We must rise the drinking age. Many argue that raising the drinking age will promote under age drinking. Contrary to belief, most teenagers will obey the law. Although there will always be those who drink anyway, raising the drinking age means there will be less people drinking under the age of 21 than if the drinking age stayed at 18.

  • It should be lowered!

    Our drinking age is already extremely high. Like one of the anonymous posters said, it is insane that you can serve in the military, vote, own a house, marry, change your citizenship, etc. before you can drink. Age has nothing to do with responsibility which seems to be a main argument on the pro side. I believe that if children are exposed to alcohol from a young age and taught how to use it responsibly the effect of lowering the rate of alcohol abuse will be much more improved. The reason people binge is because they see parents drinking, they see so many ads about alcohol, yet they are never taught the correct way to use it since that is considered taboo in our country. It is not age that equals responsibility, but the education that they get on the subject

  • No

    After reading over the conflicting opinions, I noticed that one of them said that adults are more responsible, and young adults tend to binge. It doesn't matter what the age limit is, people who are new to drinking will of course tend to binge. Think of it like this: if a child gets a new toy they have been waiting for, they will play with it very frequently for some time, then it will eventually get old and the frequency lowers. Raising the drinking age will just cause the desire to drink to increase. This will lead to more illegal activity.
    Also, i think that it is ridiculous that one can kill and die for their country, but cannot sit down with their buddies and have a beer.

  • The drinking age is already quite high in the United States.

    In nations where alcohol is not regulated as stringently, rates of alcohol abuse tend to be lower. While we should make every effort to ensure that alcohol consumption is responsible by educating youths about the dangers of binge drinking and enforcing anti-drunk driving regulations, there is no reason why a responsible 18-year-old (who can vote or join the military) cannot have a beer.

    Posted by: LivingJimmy
  • An offensive contradiction

    At the age of 18 we are considered legally independent, and with that comes the expectation that we are also able to make decisions of a highly complex nature which impact on both our nation and ourselves because we are considered suitably intellectually developed to do so. Consider a voting decision, to do it properly, you should be able to understand the various economic arguments, appreciate the impacts of various regional approaches to Asylum seekers, and have a clear understanding of what each party really stands for beyond a few superficial headline issues. At the age of 18, we are considered developed enough to do this. On a more personal level, you can join the armed forces and be flown into the most dangerous places on earth to be shot at by people who hate you with every sinew in their bodies, risk not only death, but capture by the enemy and torture at their hands. In essence, you are considered mature enough to make such a drastic decision, which is far more dangerous to you than what alcohol threatens you with. The reason the State allows us to do these things is due to the assumption that we are making an 'informed' decision, meaning that we clearly understand the potential consequences of our actions. The choice to drink is perhaps the most informed decision a teenager will ever make, on par with the choice to have safe sex. The reason being is that throughout high school there is an endless barrage of statistics, shock stories and science presented to teenagers to ensure that when the time comes, they really can make an informed decision. Contrast this to the total absence of education about the other issues such as politics and the military that are faced when turning 18, yet we are assumed to be making qualified decisions without question. If there is anything that the government should be taking a nanny state approach to on account of their belief we are ignorant fools unable to make a decision, drinking should be the last one on the agenda, as it is the singularly most understood. Almost every teenager in Australia knows the risk when they make the choice to drink, it is offensive to tell them as older ‘wiser’ generations that they can die for us with guns, but not be trusted to know the potential risks that a beer poses.

  • An offensive Contradiction

    At the age of 18 we are considered legally independent, and with that comes the expectation that we are also able to make decisions of a highly complex nature which impact on both our nation and ourselves because we are considered suitably intellectually developed to do so. Consider a voting decision, to do it properly, you should be able to understand the various economic arguments, appreciate the impacts of various regional approaches to Asylum seekers, and have a clear understanding of what each party really stands for beyond a few superficial headline issues. At the age of 18, we are considered developed enough to do this. On a more personal level, you can join the armed forces and be flown into the most dangerous places on earth to be shot at by people who hate you with every sinew in their bodies, risk not only death, but capture by the enemy and torture at their hands. In essence, you are considered mature enough to make such a drastic decision, which is far more dangerous to you than what alcohol threatens you with. The reason the State allows us to do these things is due to the assumption that we are making an 'informed' decision, meaning that we clearly understand the potential consequences of our actions. The choice to drink is perhaps the most informed decision a teenager will ever make, on par with the choice to have safe sex. The reason being is that throughout high school there is an endless barrage of statistics, shock stories and science presented to teenagers to ensure that when the time comes, they really can make an informed decision. Contrast this to the total absence of education about the other issues such as politics and the military that are faced when turning 18, yet we are assumed to be making qualified decisions without question. If there is anything that the government should be taking a nanny state approach to on account of their belief we are ignorant fools unable to make a decision, drinking should be the last one on the agenda, as it is the singularly most understood. Almost every teenager in Australia knows the risk when they make the choice to drink, it is offensive to tell them as older ‘wiser’ generations that they can die for us with guns, but not be trusted to know the potential risks that a beer poses.

  • It wouldn't change anything

    Increasing the drinking age will not change much. If 18 year olds are hooked on alcohol they won’t change their ways just because a law is changed. Instead of making kids experiment with alcohol in the alley ways let them come into bars and be taught how to drink responsibly. With bartenders who can call cabs and reject people drinks if they are too drunk.

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  • Hello hello hello

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  • Hello hello hello

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Anonymous says2013-05-02T15:04:15.563
You guys are doing good debateing this topic because this really help my 15 year old son out
mysay says2013-10-15T11:41:54.727
When I was 16, all dressed up I could get in to clubs as an 18 year old. I could not however passed as a 21 year old, until I was around 21. Increasing the age limit will never stop underage drinking but it will delay it. Every year later is a positive thing!
At 16, even at 18 I could not handle alcohol, and the repercussions were significant. I wished it had been delayed for rebellious younger me. 18 year olds rarely have the maturity, wisdom, or tolerance to be drinking, so how can it hurt.

If the age limit is changed with several years in advance planned (ie: all born from 2000 onwards) those it affects will have years of re-education about what it is they should be looking forward to as they leave school and start work or tertiary study, instead of getting exciting about getting hammered every weekend.