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Should the government fund the extinction of mosquitos?

Asked by: Babeslayer
  • They are our most effective enemy

    Mosquitoes are accountable for more than half of the deaths of all the human population since beggining of history. Some estimates put the death toll on 46 billion fatalities over the course of human history. And before any of you give any kind of crap about me not knowing what I'm talking about, here is an article from the respected scientific journal Nature which confirms that the effect of an eventual mosquito extinction would be minimal and that other species would step up to fulfill their ecological niche: http://www.Nature.Com/news/2010/100721/full/466432a.Html

  • They provide more good than you would expect! But they are terrible...

    As much as we loathe them, mosquitoes represent a considerable biomass of food for wildlife on the lower rungs of the food chain. Their extinction, were it even achievable, would have an enormous adverse affect on the entire ecosystem. Mosquito larvae are, in essence, nutrient-packed snacks for fish and other aquatic animals.

  • Waste of money.

    Although they are a major pest to us humans, they provide an incredible food supply for their predators such as birds or spiders. This would probably not be possible even with a budget of a trillion dollars. I will assume that this question is a joke. The earth would ecologically suffer greatly with the extinction of mosquitoes.

  • Government funding of eliminating a species is wrong

    Mosquitoes feed countless animals in our environment like birds, bats, and fish. Fish we eat. Eliminating them just because they're annoying is a waste of taxpayer money and will only have terrible implications to our ecosystem. There is no useless animal that doesn't contribute to the environment. Just put mosquito repellent on if you feel that bothered.


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nolanboe3200 says2013-07-19T01:12:16.807
As much as we loathe them, mosquitoes represent a considerable biomass of food for wildlife on the lower rungs of the food chain. Their extinction, were it even achievable, would have an enormous adverse affect on the entire ecosystem.