Should the Harris County Flood Control District do more to prevent flooding in Houston?

  • Economic cost from inaction on drainage

    It is embarrassing for the 5th largest city in the US to be paralyzed when we have a big rain. We like to think we are a haven for business, and all of us have benefited from the jobs created, but surely businesses which think about moving here must be starting to rethink. The economic cost of shutting down businesses, school districts, colleges, local government and city services for 2 consecutive days is enormous. We can make a business case for a tax, which all of us should support, to build proper infrastructure to make our city safe for all of our residents and viable for sustained business and education today, and for continued growth over the next hundred years. The climate has changed - big rainfall will happen again - this is not a political issue. We must work together to protect what has been built so that our community may move forward with confidence.

  • Of Course! More has to be done about this matter!

    The city of Houston as a whole needs to do better! It's sad because they collect so much money in property taxes, I think it would be beneficial to use a percentage of that to help this out of control flooding. Why? Well simple, to protect our property. In other words I don't see the use for property taxes. It would be nice to see our good hard earned money be put to good use for a change. But you know it's bad when people start to die. Houston has indeed dropped the ball on this one.

  • Flat but not equal

    We have lived in other parts of Texas where new construction has to compensate with adequate drainage. Houston's answer is to dump it on the neighbors. What that means is that certain parts of the city are more prone to flooding because of the comfortable living of people in the suburbs. Streamers should be taxed in the county to compensate to be added risk an expense for down streamers.

  • Harris County Flood Control District should do more to prevent flooding in Houston.

    If flooding in Houston were better prevented from happening, much less harm would be done. There would be less injury, less insurance claims, and less overall impact that would be had on the community of Houston. It would be much easier to put more work into prevention than to correct problems after they have already occurred.

  • Yes, prevention is the obvious solution.

    There is only so much that the government can do in the face of a state emergency. Planning for such state emergencies is the best method to prevent deaths and property destruction. In light of recent events, El Nino blindsided the state of Texas as well as other regions. True, the state has been in a drought for quite some time but the government should always be prepared for such disasters. If the dams in Texas were reinforced with stronger materials, the flooding would not have been as bad and while not being contained 100% it would have helped regardless.

  • The Harris County Flood Control District must do more to control flooding in Houston.

    With the recent massive floods in East Texas and Houston, it is apparent that Harris County Flood Control District must step up and do more to help control flooding in the region. The response and infrastructure surrounding the floods was horribly lacking and is the case of making a bad situation even worse.

  • Controlling Mother Nature?

    Hey, guess what? Houston is flat. Basic phsyics tells us that water will seek it's own level so, if you're flat, that means water will be everywhere. There are conditions we have to be willing to live with to live where we do. So, until we are either able to control weather patterns or willing to build everything up above flood level, we're going to have to accept that flat terrains are prone to flooding. Believe it or not, government can't solve everything.

  • The Harris County Flood Control District is Commited to Houston

    The Harris County Flood Control District is committed to improving the quality of life for the people of Houston. Not only have they bought out more than 3000 properties that are located hopelessly deep in the floodplain, they are also devoting a large amount of their resources to the prevention of more flooding.

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