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Should the Minimum Wage in the United States be raised?

Asked by: DerKurbis
  • Should be lower because to many rich people.

    To many rich people the people don't need a lot of money to provide for a family or children I think they should be raised and I approve this message My name is jeff and I approve this message and I dont like people and many more things I talk about

  • I think yes

    People should be paid more to get more money so they can buy what they want. I also want more money to buy things. The the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the

  • It should be raised

    Becase i sad so ha ha hah ahahahah aha ah ah ah hah ah ha ha ha h ah ha ha ha h ah ahha ha hah aha ha ha ha ha ha h ahahah ha hah aaha ha a ha ha ha ha ha ah ah ha ahaahaha ha a

  • Increasing the minimum wage would harm small businesses the most, not to mention cause inflation for everyone.

    Not only would raising the minimum wage harm small businesses and cause inflation, but what would happen to workers wages, who are earning slightly more than minimum wage, when the minimum wage is raised? Let's say an employee who started at minimum wage has been working for an employer for 5 to 10 years, and now makes $10/hour. If the minimum wage were to be raised to let's just say $12/hour, chances are that the worker making 10 would only be raised to 12 when the wage goes up, since the employer would already have to raise wages of new employees. How would that be fair to workers who have been loyal employees to make the same wage as new employees?

  • Counter Productive Economics

    History has shown that the enterprise of the free market, a better and more effective method of economics, develops best under the premise that no minimum wage exists because:

    1. Competition among businesses will soar as companies compete to higher the best and brightest for seeing who can afford the highest wages and best working conditions to their employees, stimulating the economy.
    2. The abolition of the minimum wage enables workers giving their labors to companies like McDonalds to acquire skills for wages that are reasonable but not as high nor within the same ballpark as the wages of doctors and lawyers. This way, when employees flipping burgers continue doing so, their labors go towards their end goal - which is to become more able to grow their own business or to get far in the ranking ladder of a company that had already been founded.
    3. The minimum wage ships jobs overseas by gutting corporations and small businesses, sending family grocery stores into collapse and bankruptcy and forcing corporations to export jobs to labor governments where they can invest in 30-cent labor of women and children in poor sweatshop conditions. But we as Americans must concern ourselves with the details of how this can be fixed so that American jobs remain on American soil.

  • It will hurt the economy and kill jobs

    As a poverty program, raising the minimum wage is like killing flies with a shotgun, not very well targeted. About 60% of the officially poor don’t work, so the only thing raising the minimum wage does for them is to make it harder for them to get a job if they ever decide they want one. Workers must bring at least as much value to the firm as they are paid or the firm will fail and all jobs will be lost (no GM bailouts are available to our 6 million small employers that employ half of our private sector workforce). Raising the minimum wage raises the hurdle a worker must cross to justify being hired.
    It is estimated that less than 15% of the total increase in wages resulting from an increase in the minimum will go to people below the poverty line and less than a third of those receiving the minimum wage are families below the poverty line. Most minimum wage workers are from above median income families. So, most of the people benefiting from the minimum wage are not the intended targets of the “anti-poverty” aspect of raising the minimum wage.
    As a jobs program, raising the minimum wage is a real loser. Congress raised the minimum wage 10.6% in July, 2009 (know of anyone else getting a raise then?). In the ensuring 6 months, nearly 600,000 teen jobs disappeared, even with nearly 4% growth in the economy, this compared to a loss of 250,000 jobs in the first half of the year as GDP growth declined by 4% Why? When you raise the price of anything, people take less of it, including labor. The unemployment rate for teens remains unacceptably high. Workers of all ages that are relatively unskilled are adversely impacted by this policy.

  • It will not only hurt the economy, it will kill jobs.

    As a poverty program, raising the minimum wage is like killing flies with a shotgun, not very well targeted. About 60% of the officially poor don’t work, so the only thing raising the minimum wage does for them is to make it harder for them to get a job if they ever decide they want one. Workers must bring at least as much value to the firm as they are paid or the firm will fail and all jobs will be lost (no GM bailouts are available to our 6 million small employers that employ half of our private sector workforce). Raising the minimum wage raises the hurdle a worker must cross to justify being hired.
    It is estimated that less than 15% of the total increase in wages resulting from an increase in the minimum will go to people below the poverty line and less than a third of those receiving the minimum wage are families below the poverty line. Most minimum wage workers are from above median income families. So, most of the people benefiting from the minimum wage are not the intended targets of the “anti-poverty” aspect of raising the minimum wage.
    As a jobs program, raising the minimum wage is a real loser. Congress raised the minimum wage 10.6% in July, 2009 (know of anyone else getting a raise then?). In the ensuring 6 months, nearly 600,000 teen jobs disappeared, even with nearly 4% growth in the economy, this compared to a loss of 250,000 jobs in the first half of the year as GDP growth declined by 4% Why? When you raise the price of anything, people take less of it, including labor. The unemployment rate for teens remains unacceptably high. Workers of all ages that are relatively unskilled are adversely impacted by this policy.

  • It will not only hurt the economy, it will kill jobs.

    As a poverty program, raising the minimum wage is like killing flies with a shotgun, not very well targeted. About 60% of the officially poor don’t work, so the only thing raising the minimum wage does for them is to make it harder for them to get a job if they ever decide they want one. Workers must bring at least as much value to the firm as they are paid or the firm will fail and all jobs will be lost (no GM bailouts are available to our 6 million small employers that employ half of our private sector workforce). Raising the minimum wage raises the hurdle a worker must cross to justify being hired.
    It is estimated that less than 15% of the total increase in wages resulting from an increase in the minimum will go to people below the poverty line and less than a third of those receiving the minimum wage are families below the poverty line. Most minimum wage workers are from above median income families. So, most of the people benefiting from the minimum wage are not the intended targets of the “anti-poverty” aspect of raising the minimum wage.
    As a jobs program, raising the minimum wage is a real loser. Congress raised the minimum wage 10.6% in July, 2009 (know of anyone else getting a raise then?). In the ensuring 6 months, nearly 600,000 teen jobs disappeared, even with nearly 4% growth in the economy, this compared to a loss of 250,000 jobs in the first half of the year as GDP growth declined by 4% Why? When you raise the price of anything, people take less of it, including labor. The unemployment rate for teens remains unacceptably high. Workers of all ages that are relatively unskilled are adversely impacted by this policy.


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