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Should the police officers who pepper sprayed and punched Occupy Wall Street protestors be charged?

  • Yes, he broke the law.

    The police officers who pepper sprayed and punched Occupy protestors should be charged and tried in a court of law for breaking the law. Wearing a badge does not give an officer the right to abuse people and harm them for no reason at all, and the entire police force has been cavalier in their treatment of protestors, who have every constitutional right to do what they are doing.

  • Yes, he broke the law.

    The police officers who pepper sprayed and punched Occupy protestors should be charged and tried in a court of law for breaking the law. Wearing a badge does not give an officer the right to abuse people and harm them for no reason at all, and the entire police force has been cavalier in their treatment of protestors, who have every constitutional right to do what they are doing.

  • From What I saw

    The group I saw was just sitting there, doing what the officers told them. Then they started pepper spraying them for no reason. Those officers should be prosecuted, and anyone else who misused their power on people who were complying with what the officers instructed them to do. I know there were other circumstances where protesters did break the law, and become violent themselves. I am pretty sure they were charged. So why are these officers any different? We have two different sets of rules for people, and it is getting ridiculous!

  • Police brutality needs to end.

    I don't see how there can be any question about whether or not these police officers used excessive force and brutality, especially when it comes to nonviolent protestors. It seems that either the officers were taking their rage out on the protestors because of their views, or were simply enjoying abusing the power we give to them.

  • Pepper Spray, No. Punch, Absolutely.

    So we have a bunch of people and they want to stay in the park. However, the park has a curfew and the people have not received a permit. Since there is a curfew, the cops ask the people to leave, and they refuse. So what is a cop supposed to do?

    We have curfew laws that prevent rape and drug deals in public parks. While this is not the occupier's intent, we have to apply this sensible law to everyone--across the board. If a man in a suit is walking through a park after curfew, the police should ask him to leave.

    So what is he to do? Is he supposed to ask and then walk away when people don't want to listen. Well just because someone organizes in the name of a cause does not make them immune. But they seem harmless enough, right? Well we really shouldn't go off of what seems legitimate. If this were the case, then the cop could let the man in the suit use the park, while the homeless man could not, based upon appearances. Here, we have blatant stereotyping and unequal treatment. No, the cops have to ask again. Then they need to give a warning that they may attempt to physically remove the participants, and if they ignore the request, then they should be able to use reasonable force, and in the face of people clinching arms who are ready to resist, they can use a slightly higher force. This is what happened in the Tulsa Occupy Movement.

    However, if it were private land, there would be absolutely no reason that they could take such measures. But there are rules that need to be applied across the board, and if someone wants to get an exception, then they can apply, but they can't expect special treatment because they seem harmless--they can't expect favorable treatment because of their age, appearance, race...

    Punching, however, is inexcusable, this is not done for the purpose of enforcing the law, only for the purpose of inflicting pain. Those who punched should be charged with battery.


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