Amazon.com Widgets

Should the press be allowed to record the police during public meetings?

  • Yes, the press should be allowed to record the police during public meetings.

    Police should be held accontable, just like the other branches of governtment. One of the ways we do this is through the press, which is why we have the freedom of speech as outlined in the first amendment. Taking away this power is a violation of human rights and can lead to further misconduct.

  • If it's a public meeting, then why not?

    If the police are in a public meeting, there is no reason the press shouldn't be allowed to record them. Obviously, the same wouldn't be true if they were meeting in private, as this could potentially reveal confidential information. In the public setting, though, they should be treated just like anyone else.

  • Especially if law enforcement is hosting the meeting

    Public meetings should be recorded, at least for accuracy's sake. If members of law enforcement should regret their words in the future, perhaps they will consider them more carefully. The press believe whole-heartedly that recording and holding ANY public official accountable for their actions and words falls firmly under our protected right to freedom of speech.

  • Yes, the press should be allowed to record the police during public meetings.

    The press should be allowed to record the police during public meetings. Most states have sunshine laws which require that public meetings be made open to the public. Therefore, the press has a right to record what goes on in public meetings with the police, so that people can learn what is going on. The police serve the people, and the people have a right to know what their police are doing.

  • No responses have been submitted.

Leave a comment...
(Maximum 900 words)
No comments yet.