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Should the U.S. pass the Working Families Flexibility Act?

  • Yes, the U.S. should pass the Working Families Flexibility Act

    The proposed act seems to be a real boon for private sector working families whose time often becomes more valuable than their salaries. Since government workers have a similar option to trade overtime for comp time, the private sector would benefit just as greatly, provided the same rules are followed.

  • Yes I support the Working Families flexibility act

    The act will allow parents, both fathers and mothers to be able to support their family by putting in as much work that is necessary to keep the family running as a happy, stable household. This would keep families from running into too much debt for just having a family.

  • No, it isn't what it sounds like.

    While this act sounds good and supportive, that is mostly just a smoke screen. This act requires a person to already have a kind, understanding and generally benevolent employer to function as it sounds like it would. Otherwise, the person may find themselves with a sudden drop in paycheck size and still missing out on all those family functions.

  • The 'Working Families Flexibility Act' is a complete scam

    The Republican party has tried to push this act through continuously since 1997 under a variety of different names. It been defeated everytime and will hopefully go down this time as well. The acts appeal depends on a number of deceptions designed to make it sound benign.

    First on the supposed "protections" is that it is contingent on a "written contract" between employer and employee. Wow, surely this will give the employee a huge amount of leverage and "flexibility". Contra this fantasy anyone who has worked in a professional private sector job knows contracts that strip employees of their rights, think binding arbitration agreements, are mandatory as conditions of employment, the employee has no choice, there is no negotiation, you sign whats put in front of you or find a new job. So, you are called in to HR, sign your overtime away, and that's all she wrote.

    Second your employer can bank your comp time and is under no obligation to grant it to you for any reason at all. Simply put, you have no rights at all to "#Yourtime". Try and complain about it and you can be fired on the spot, courts have consistently ruled that such overt terminations are not considered as "retaliation". Rather than gaining flexibility, you have actually lost significant leverage in your relationship with your employer. Your manager now has another tool, your oh so fragile comp days, that can be hung over your head at every turn.

    Thirdly, when your employer reaches the end of the fiscal period and is forced to cash you out, you will receive the pay at your standard wage scale. Your extra halftime pay is gone and you have probably not used more than a few days of your "flexible" comp time. In the mean time your boss has been making a tidy profit off the interest free loan youso generously volunteered to them in a written contract.

    If you think the above sounds like a great deal then you have to be a employer, manager, or HR admin. As an employee there is zero benefit here for you.

  • No, it isn't what it sounds like.

    While this act sounds good and supportive, that is mostly just a smoke screen. This act requires a person to already have a kind, understanding and generally benevolent employer to function as it sounds like it would. Otherwise, the person may find themselves with a sudden drop in paycheck size and still missing out on all those family functions.


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