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  • For 2 reasons.

    Stability. The Euro is highly unstable. The Pound is not. The EU is made up of so many conflicting nations that you don't want them making laws for you.

    Also, the EU can never make up it's mind. This isn't a silly flaw... It's serious. The Bosnian War only happened (twice) because the EU couldn't agree on who would lead the army or take responsibility. For years, massacres went on with the EU intervening.

    Second Reason... I hate the UK but love them.. .Like brothers. I'm too in love with England and English history to want to see them lose their cultural individuality.

  • Get us out!

    Let me start by saying that I don't hate Europe. Europe is the best continent on the planet, it's diverse with countless languages and a history more valuable than anything. I make regular visits to different European countries every year. But just because you're friends with someone, doesn't mean you should sleep with them. Just because we love Europe, doesn't mean we have to be in this union with them.

    The EU can be likened to communism, to the USSR. Think about it. Any law the UK makes that contradicts an EU law or that the EU doesn't agree with WILL be overruled and become null and void even if it has 100% support from parliament and from the British public. For example, when the British government wanted to reduce tax on insulation to encourage energy efficiency, the EU decided that we couldn't have variable taxes on certain products. Even though this affected absolutely no one in any country but the UK and that those who it did affect it affected positively, Brussels had to stick its nose into OUR internal affairs and make a scene.
    Leaving the EU will give us our power back.

    Immigration. It had to come up. All EU citizens are allowed to move freely around Europe (provided they have documentation when leaving the Schengen zone), to live anywhere in the EU and to work anywhere in the EU. So all EU citizens (all 500 million of them!) are allowed, under EU law, to live and work in the UK and there is absolutely nothing we can do to stop them. Of course, not all 0.5bn are coming to the UK but a hell of a lot are. The Labour government in 2004 said that when Poland joined the EU, we could expect around 15,000 Polish immigrants. How wrong were they? Very wrong indeed. We had over 40 times that number with a shocking 600,000 Poles entering the UK and settling there. Polish is now the second most spoken language in England and Wales. If most of the Poles are working, let's say 500,000 of them, then that's 500,000 jobs they have stolen from Britons who are unemployed. This wouldn't happen anywhere else in the world, in the US you cannot immigrate if you are taking a job that could be done by an American, the law is the same the world over, but just because we are in bed with Poland and 27 other member states, means we have to take anyone that comes to us, no questions asked. We have 2.5million unemployed of our own, and we could give one fifth of them jobs JUST by restricting immigration from Poles. We can check their passports, if it's an EU passport...They have to get through. It's disgraceful.
    A small number of immigrants is fine; 600,000 from just one country is not. It also means all the skilled workers from Poland are missing!

  • This doesn't make sense.

    The UK isn't a full part of the EU to begin with. They have an opt-out on the Economic and Monetary Union (don't use the Euro), don't participate in the Schengen agreement (which eliminates EU internal border checks), have an opt-out on police and justice matters, and also an opt-out on the Charter of Fundamental Rights. For all intents and purposes they AREN'T in the EU.

  • The pros far outweigh the cons.

    Indeed, the UK enjoys huge amounts of trade with other EU members. The benefit to the British economy from being in the EU is huge. Just look at the trade figures with Germany, and that's just one country(even if the EU's largest economy). And please no 'they need us more than we them' BS, that's not true as many economists have again and again pointed out.

    Another thing eurosceptics like to point out is immigration. Again, pretty weak arguments here. 'They steal our jobs'. No, honey, they don't actually. The UK is experiencing a shortage of workers with an ageing population, so they aren't stealing jobs. They simply can't. And if you're not happy with your country having a lot more skilled workers and thus a stronger economy, then I don't know what you've been smoking.

  • It's not what you think it is

    Many Eurosceptics have argued that if the UK was to vote ‘yes’ when asked if they would like to leave the referendum then there would be a better chance in trading, economic advantages, restrictions on immigration and an escape from European laws and regulations. Some of these Eurosceptics want to establish a trading plan with Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein’s European Free Trade Association (EFTA) in the hope that it would keep the UK as a major player in world trading considering it’s one of the most major factors its economy. The Prime Minister of Norway, Erna Solberg, however, has argued that “those in the British debate who look at Norway's association underestimate how closely connected we actually are with many of the laws and rules they are annoyed with”. If one of the main aims of Eurosceptics is to escape the laws which are imposed on the entire union from within Brussels then they are mistaken, other countries outside of the EU are placed under the European Laws. In an article published in January earlier this year, The Huffington Post wrote:

    “Norway is subject to around one third of the regulation that full EU members subscribe to, but still has a common policy on agriculture, fishing, justice and home affairs. Because Norway is outside the EU, products can face high EU import tariffs. And it contributes €340 million a year to the EU – but does not have voting rights because it is
    not a full member.”

    From this statement Eurosceptics face another issue with an independent Britain; if we were to become independent, we would have to pay much larger tariffs in order to trade with the EU. Since one of the largest factors in the growth of our economy is trade and are largest trading partner is the Republic of Ireland, an independent Britain would struggle, isolated or associated within the EFTA, when competing with the other major growing trading partners of the world such as the PRC (China), India and the US. It is true that the EFTA have been conceding much better trading deals with India in comparison to the EU but the idea that Britain would do better off being able to trade with India outside of the EU is a very minute example. Although India is a rising giant in trading, the EU and the US are beginning to collaborate in order to establish one of the largest free-trading areas in the world. If we were to leave the EU we would be confined to a much smaller free trade and still pay millions in order to make good trades with countries such as Ireland, France, Germany, etc.

    This is only my argument and I appreciate and respect anyone else’s opinions but in 2017 if the plans do go ahead I will be voting “no”.

  • There's always another side to the coin.

    Many Eurosceptics have argued that if the UK was to vote ‘yes’ when asked if they would like to leave the referendum then there would be a better chance in trading, economic advantages, restrictions on immigration and an escape from European laws and regulations. Some of these Eurosceptics want to establish a trading plan with Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein’s European Free Trade Association (EFTA) in the hope that it would keep the UK as a major player in world trading considering it’s one of the most major factors its economy. The Prime Minister of Norway, Erna Solberg, however, has argued that “those in the British debate who look at Norway's association underestimate how closely connected we actually are with many of the laws and rules they are annoyed with”. If one of the main aims of Eurosceptics is to escape the laws which are imposed on the entire union from within Brussels then they are mistaken, other countries outside of the EU are placed under the European Laws. In an article published in January earlier this year, The Huffington Post wrote:

    “Norway is subject to around one third of the regulation that full EU members subscribe to, but still has a common policy on agriculture, fishing, justice and home affairs. Because Norway is outside the EU, products can face high EU import tariffs. And it contributes €340 million a year to the EU – but does not have voting rights because it is not a full member.”

    From this statement Eurosceptics face another issue with an independent Britain; if we were to become independent, we would have to pay much larger tariffs in order to trade with the EU. Since one of the largest factors in the growth of our economy is trade and are largest trading partner is the Republic of Ireland, an independent Britain would struggle, isolated or associated within the EFTA, when competing with the other major growing trading partners of the world such as the PRC (China), India and the US. It is true that the EFTA have been conceding much better trading deals with India in comparison to the EU but the idea that Britain would do better off being able to trade with India outside of the EU is a very minute example. Although India is a rising giant in trading, the EU and the US are beginning to collaborate in order to establish one of the largest free-trading areas in the world. If we were to leave the EU we would be confined to a much smaller free trade and still pay millions in order to make good trades with countries such as Ireland, France, Germany, etc.

    This is only my argument and I appreciate and respect anyone else’s opinions but in 2017 if the plans do go ahead I will be voting “no”.


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