Should the Words "under God" Be in the US Pledge of Allegiance?

  • Yes, GOD is important in our country

    Our country was founded by Christian leaders who followed the Bible. God should not be someone who is only part of our spiritual lives, but also part of our physical life and how we live. The phase "under God" was a statement that our country would be submitted to God's will and that we as a country would follow Him and let Him lead the leaders of our country. We are a nation founded under God. We should never try to remove God from our lives. When we do, we are no longer under His protection and blessing. There is freedom of religion in the United States, but the United States of America ultimately chose this as part of our Pledge of Allegiance. Their is only true freedom through the forgiveness of sins in the blood of Jesus Christ. Have you experienced true freedom?

  • I am tired of people throwing the phrase "Separation of Church and State" out there.

    Is it sad that people actually think that the above phrase is in the Constitution? The Constitution States "Congress shall not make a law respecting the establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof." The phrase "Separation of Church and State" came from a letter written by Thomas Jefferson, in 1802, to Baptists in Danbury, Connecticut. The Baptists heard a rumor that there was going to be a national Christian Denomination set up. He answered that it was not true and there would remain a "separation of church and state." People are so quick to quote him on it. Well I've got a quote that I would like throw out there:
    "We have staked the whole future of American civilization, not upon the power of government, far from it. We have staked the future of all of our political institutions upon the capacity of each and all of us to govern ourselves ... According to the Ten Commandments of God."
    - James Madison, The Chief Architect of the Constitution.

    The words "Under God" is not the establishment of religion.
    The establishment clause was intended to keep congress from establishing a Christian Denomination. At the time that the Bill of Rights were added to our Constitution, 99% of people belonged to a an established denomination, the other 1% were Diest, which means that they believed in God based on rational grounds, and not just faith alone.
    In conclusion, the words "Under God" should be in the Pledge.

  • YES because those who don't believe just can just choose not say it

    The words "under God" were added to the Pledge of Allegiance in 1954 to show the world the contrast between the USA and the Communists. The words were added because the US is truly a nation under God. They should not be taken out. Also, when Pearl Harbor was attacked the President asked the country to pray. During the years following World War II when the US was fighting the Cold War, "In God we Trust" was adopted as our national motto.

  • Yes, because majority of society believes in a God.

    Most Americans are associated with some type of religion or believe in a higher power. Therefore, I believe that the words "Under God" should remain in the US Pledge of Allegiance. I also am a firm believer that its your decision if you decide to say it or not. But, overall i don't see why it should be taken out therefore its fine.

  • What ever happened to freedom of religion?

    As an atheist, I don't want to pledge my allegiance to something I don't even believe exists. If there's really freedom of religion, why would they mention a specific believe in the pledge? Since they're so any different religions in this country, pledging to God could actually be offensive. This is an issue because most schools make you say the pledge of allegiance an students will get in trouble if they don't (I know from experience.) That's why "Under God" shouldn't be in the pledge of allegiance.

  • Separation of Church and State

    Conservatives will defend the constitution to the end unless it involves religion. The separation of church and state is crystal clear and as such "under God" should not be forced onto those who don't believe. Additionally, if you don't believe in God that doesn't make you less American. Atheists, agnostics and anyone non-religious deserves equal representation. So take your god(s), fairy tales, superstitions out of the political realm.

  • Separation of church and state, "under God" was added in later.

    "Under God" was added in 1954 because people were scared of communism, communists don't believe in God so they added that in the pledge as a way to feel like they were fighting communism. Since 1954, America has become a lot more diverse. There are more non-believers and more who practice other religions than there were in 1954 and it's more socially accepted now to not be Christian. The pledge should reflect all Americans and not just Americans who happen to be Christian. No God of any religion belongs in law or Government, one of the reasons America was settled in the first place was because people were looking for a place where they could practice whatever religion they wanted to without the government being involved. 'Under God" should be removed.

  • Under god please

    God doesn't favor us over others
    This is taught to be true in the Bible when God lead the Israelite over the Malachites,
    God is neither to be credited or scorned for the results of our foreign and domestic policies
    Christians spend their lives in a personal search for God.
    Our Government is Godless

  • God has no place in the US government

    We have a separation of church and state. It doesn't matter what the majority of people think/believe. Your religion stays out of public schools, government decisions, and the lives of other people. The US was not founded on christian beliefs. Making kids say "under god" in the pledge at school violates that. It should stay out.

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