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  • Uniforms should be allowed.

    Is school supposed to be a fashion show or a place to learn? Students always brag about what they are wearing. Most people can have envy because of the students who talk boastingly. However, some students wear inappropriate clothes, such as spaghetti straps or shorts that are short. This is why we should have uniforms at school. Uniforms are a sensational idea because it prevents bullying, students focus on schoolwork more, and parents save time and money. Bullying is a big problem at school and uniforms are a perfect way to stop it. Most bullies judge people on how they look like or what they wear. If uniforms are allowed, the bullying will end. Since the bully is wearing the same clothes, he/she won't pick on what they are wearing. Some students may be poor and don't have money for clothes. The bully can notice that they are wearing the same clothes over and over again everyday. That can cause bullying too, but uniforms would prevent that because you need to wear the uniforms everyday.
    It is said that uniforms can lead students to focus on schoolwork more than clothes. It is because some people take hours trying to decide what clothes they are going to wear. Some students have frustration and can miss the bus while taking so much time picking clothes. Parents don't need to waste their money and time getting expensive clothes or anything. So as you can see, uniforms are a phenomenal idea!

  • Many people can't afford expensive and trendy clothes.

    From the point of view of a person who was required to wear uniforms, I believe they are a good thing. I came from a family of eight kids, and my parents couldn't afford for me to have a lot of stylish or trendy clothes. By being required to wear uniforms by my school I was spared the problem of being obviously poor compared to some of my classmates. I could go to school and not worry about looking different. Uniforms do cost money, but you can get by having a couple of pieces of each required item. When you wear your own clothes it is entirely obvious that you are wearing the same things day after day. Uniforms also eliminate the natural distractions.

  • Yes, uniforms should be worn, you have less to worry about.

    I wear a uniform to school every day, it's great because you don't have to worry about what you're wearing. It helps me focus on my school work better and it's easier to get dressed, because you don't have to get up early in the morning to worry about how you look.

  • Yes, uniforms create a positive learning environment, free from tension about who is wearing what.

    Uniforms also increase security in schools, as it is very easy for a teacher to spot who is supposed to be in the school and who is not. This is especially important in high school. Uniforms eliminate the competition between kids as to who is the best dressed and each child can be judged on their actions, not their clothing.

  • Yes, uniforms should be required

    From the point of view of a person who was required to wear uniforms, I believe they are a good thing. I came from a family of eight kids, and my parents couldn't afford for me to have a lot of stylish or trendy clothes. By being required to wear uniforms by my school I was spared the problem of being obviously poor compared to some of my classmates. I could go to school and not worry about looking different. Uniforms do cost money, but you can get by on having a couple of pieces of each required item. When you wear your own clothes it is entirely obvious that you are wearing the same things day after day. Uniforms also eliminate the natural distractions students have when they are checking out everyone else's clothes.

  • Yes, they make students more comfortable.

    Yes, as much as students like to complain about them, uniforms should be required in schools. Students can go to school not having to worry about how they are dressed, and whether they are like the students next to them. Uniforms make things a lot easier for students, so they can worry about their academics.

  • They should be.

    They should be because there don't excludes kids. It will decrease the amount of bullying. Students wont kill each other over designer jackets. Less kids would worry about what to wear. No one has to worry about if what they are wearing is the latest trend. Kids would feel like they are in a safer environment.

  • Yes, they should stay.

    Uniforms should stay for many different reasons. First of all, uniforms should stay because we are going to need it in the future when we get a job, wearing it now in school is just like wearing it in the future. Also because if we wear it , it would be less of a hassle in the mornings to pick out cloth and also helpful to the less fortunate to have to buy such expensive clothing anymore.

  • Yes they should.

    Yes, they should because if schools had uniforms then they wouldn't have to worry about a dress code, bullying would decrease because students are judged by what kind of clothes they wear
    and it would also decrease suicide count because bullying leads to suicide. Parents also would not complain about the way students dress at school.

  • I think schools SHOULD HAVE uniforms here's why!

    1 because, then bullies can't argue with want u are wearing. 2 because, if there was a intruder, we would notice him right away! 3 because, school decreased deadly weapons in a school, drugs went down, and vandalism went down too. This is why schools SHOULD have uniforms, so yeah.

  • Uniforms should not be required

    Although uniforms keep getting ready for school more simple, they in no way should be required. I believe the best part of being a child is showing off their individuality, and by making them all wear the same thing everyday takes that away from them. Plus by enforcing uniforms, you are also forcing parents to purchase a wardrobe full of expensive uniforms, and to have to pay for clothes to be worn after school. Which makes it more expensive on them.

  • What the hell does it even do?

    Why is there school uniforms? Because school is trying to make everyone do something they don't want to, even stuff other than uniforms. But why does a school uniform help us with our lives? They should never be allowed in the first place. Just because we wear hoods means we are in a gang? Just because we wear red sweaters means we're gang members? Get your facts right. School uniforms are a waste of money. School is a retarded place. Fuck school uniforms

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  • School uniform may delay the transition into adulthood

    Adults make their own clothing choices and have the freedom to express themselves through their appearance. Denying children and teenagers the opportunity to make those choices may make them ill-prepared for the adult world. Adolescents see clothing choices as a means of identification, and seeking an identity is one of the critical stages of adolescence, according to the late developmental psychologist Erik Erikson.

  • School uniforms may delay the transition into adulthood

    Adults make their own clothing choices and have the freedom to express themselves through their appearance. Denying children and teenagers the opportunity to make those choices may make them ill-prepared for the adult world. Adolescents see clothing choices as a means of identification, and seeking an identity is one of the critical stages of adolescence, according to the late developmental psychologist Erik Erikson.

  • School uniform delay the transition into manhood

    Adults make their own clothing choices and have the freedom to express themselves through their appearance. Denying children and teenagers the opportunity to make those choices may make them ill-prepared for the adult world. Adolescents see clothing choices as a means of identification, and seeking an identity is one of the critical stages of adolescence, according to the late developmental psychologist Erik Erikson.

  • Noo o o

    No no no no no no no noo o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o oo o o o o o o o o o

  • No no no

    No. No no no no no noo nooooo no noo nonon ono non on no no no no no no no on no o no o o no onononono no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no non and finally no. .

  • Anonymous And NO

    Uniforms take the freedom away from kids and it delays the transfer into adulthood. If a kid wore a uniform all throughout his schooling years he won't be able to dress themselves. Also, when you are at school other students might judge you on how that uniforms fits you and how it looks on you.

  • School uniforms shouldn't be required

    School uniforms are inconvenient, they cause bullying says a 1999 stud and they are costly. So I say no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no non ono non onononon o no no n on on on o no n


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