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Should video games be allowed in physical education programs?

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  • Video games help your reflexes; And the Navy

    Many parents think video games are just a waste of time and rots the brain. But, after doing some hard research, it has been scientifically proven that video games help your reflexes; and from personal experience, my reflexes have improved vastly over time. On doing more research, I found out video games are used to train people in the navy, helping them understand ways to use a jet. These are personal experiences I've had, and stuff I found researching. How do you feel about video games being in Physical Education programs now?

  • Video games help your reflexes

    Many parents think video games are just a waste of time and rots the brain. But, after doing some hard research, it has been scientifically proven that video games help your reflexes; and from personal experience, my reflexes have improved vastly over time. On doing more research, I found out video games are used to train people in the navy, helping them understand ways to use a jet. These are personal experiences I've had, and stuff I found researching. How do you feel about video games being in Physical Education programs now?

  • Video games can help with physical skills

    Preschool children who played interactive games such as the games on the Wii have been shown to improve motor skills, for example the children can kick, catch and throw better than the children who do not play video games. Vision is also improved particularly telling the different shades of grey. This is useful for driving at night, piloting a plane or reading x-rays.

  • Games can be physical

    Games should be in gym class because us kids play game all the time when I get home from school I play my game. If we play games that don't involve sitting like the wii or the kinect we move a lot. We can play just dance or wii sports. The mix is better then both by them self.

  • Video Games Could Be Part Of Physical Education

    With the introduction of the Wii and other motion based gaming consoles, it is a legitimate idea to add these video games to physical education programs. The cost of implementing this type of inclusion could be very costly and probably is not a feasible option, however, the actions some of these games require, are very close to a workout.

  • Yes, video games should be allowed in physical education programs.

    Introducing students to video games such as Wii Fit and other active, interactive, movement-based video games would add a technological element to fitness that some students may find appealing. It opens the doors to fitness to kids who might otherwise never do anything fitness-related after the PE class, and so should be allowed in small doses (with the continuation of more traditional fitness activities).

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  • Would it help not in your life

    In p.E you learn about fitness and strength but with video games you learn to use your hands and thumbs and fingers not another body muscles plus that would make them more fat and would lead to more populated obesity people and kids think about that for the future .

  • Goes against the point

    Video games in physical education programs goes against the point, doesn't it? Video games don't improve hand eye coordination any more than physical activities, and they certainly don't seem to get anybody off of the couch. This isn't to knock video games entirely as an entertainment device, but they are neither physical nor educational.

  • They should not.

    Video games should not be allowed in physical education programs. The purpose of physical education programs is to get people to become more fit and healthy, and video games do not do this. If you want to play video games, do it on your free time but not during PE.

  • Video Games Not Suitable for P.E. Programs

    Video games can be used in an educational setting, but they aren't suitable for physical education programs. In reality, these games wouldn't benefit students trying to learn about physical fitness and proper dieting. Therefore, video games should be kept out of these programs and not entertained as a viable teaching device.

  • Video games are entertainment not physical education

    Video games should not be included in physical education programs. There is a separate place for video games in the entertainment industry. Physical education should be focused on being active and staying fit. There is no need to try to put the two very different activities into the same education system.

  • Video games should not be allowed in physical education programs.

    Video games should not be allowed in physical education programs. There is a place for video games and the school system is not the time or place for them. We send our children to physical education so they can get exercise outside of the home where they are usually playing these games.

  • There is quite a bit more to having video games for this than you think.

    I don't think a Wii would work very well. The controllers can be a hazard and the wii fit board is very small and doesn't look like it would provide much physical activity (I don't own one so I could be wrong). So assume that the wii is not an option, that means they school would have to use the xbox 360 with kinect, the xbox one, the playstation 3 with move or the playstation 4 with its motion tracker. The new systems would simply be too much so I will focus on xbox 360 and playstation 3 I am also going to use a low estimate of 20 students per class and assume all games will be played with two players, halving the needed number of items. I will also not count any sales tax or bulk deals. Now for the cost... Xbox 360: a 4gb version is $180 on wallmart.Com, I could only find a sensor bundled with kinect adventures which is $100 the cheapest fitness game (biggest loser ultimate workout) is $13. So far $293, multiply by ten and you get $2930. Now you're going to need ten t.Vs. An RCA 19" tv is $150, so $1500 for ten. Add that to the sys/game cost and it's $4430. Playstation: one console+sensor+game(multiply by ten)=$2820+same tv=$4320
    This really wouldn't be much for a school by its self but now the gym will need 10 new electrical outlets, so lots of wiring and probably a separate fuse box or two. Add on the new electric bill and battery costs and it adds up really fast. That's just for a small class, imagine doubling all of this for a class of 40 in a large school. Sorry for the massive rant but I was trying to be thorough.


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