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  • I never desired to be stuck up or negative, but holy fuck you guys are ignorant.

    I'm just going to quickly debunk the gateway drug theory in terms of the drug itself. To put simply: life is about balance, there are legal risks and bad decisions all around us. But it is the people's choice to choose self control. You can't die from enough marijuana, but you can die from drinking too much water and drowning your lungs, but are you we going to ban water? Fuck no. This goes with anything in life. Its not the drug itself (in terms of non-physically addictive drugs such as marijuana or any psychedelic), its the person doing the drug. It was there choice to move up, not marijuana's choice. If they build a tolerance to marijuana and lose the high, take a break for a couple weeks. It's not physically addictive so you can NOT get withdraws. Meanwhile doctors are prescribing Xanax, klonopin, benzos, hydrocodone, oxycotin, and other pain killers or anxiety relievers that are 10x more addictive but we seem to hand it out like candy expecting no precautions. How much information and logic will it take to get it through your thick skulls that banning marijuana is illogical, Unamerican, and will NOT solve anything.

  • Drugs aren't the government's problem.

    On the legal-side: I believe this falls under the 4th Amendment- the government is not allowed, through the Constitution, to search and seize your property, including your drugs, without "probable cause and warrant."

    On the ethical-moral-side: Drugs can't 'necessarily' harm others more so than the user. Yes, they are/ never will be completely safe and free of addictions- however, weed has been noted to be less dangerous than even caffeine with addiction levels, for example. ( If I can locate my source soon, I will cite it in the replies.) I also believe people to be responsible enough that we can trust them to take drugs appropriately if they so choose. It's their responsibility to know what they are taking- I trust that they do when they take them.

    Lastly, as a loyal tax payer, I frown upon my taxes/money going toward the drug war. If I am paying taxes, I expect only the upmost necessary of government agencies, departments, (etc.) to use it.

    Thanks everyone and have a great week.

  • Cannabis does not belong in the Controlled Substances Act.

    Cannabis is far less dangerous than alcohol and tobacco - neither of which is subject to regulation under the controlled substances act. Neither has medicinal, or a positive recreational value.

    Cannabis, on the other hand, is therapeutic even when used recreationally. There is no danger with ingesting cannabis in various forms, and the perceived dangers are largely fabricated by opponents of legalization.

    Cannabis derived CBD was also just approved by the FDA. This pretty much goes against Schedule I requirements under the CSA.

  • Isn't America the Land of the Free?

    The federal ban on marijuana is illegal. Nowhere in the Constitution does it give the federal government the authority to ban drugs. In order to do so, we would need to amend the Constitution. That never happened. It should be a state decision. And either way, it's not the government's business what you put in your body. The federal government exists to protect citizens from foriegn invasion, not to impose their moral principles on its citizens.

  • Places in the U.S. have legalized it, just check your facts.

    Many other problems referenced are more of an issue based on the place than the legitimately few problems caused by weed. Latin America had certain issues to start with.

    In addition, at this point, very little research has been done on this drug. Making it legal would cause less of an arrest problem, and would stop many people from getting it in shady ways. Further, it would help with a more reliable regulation of the drug.

    To Araranger: "The report, titled "A Study of the Local Social and Economic Impacts of Legal Cannabis, Since the Legalization of Recreational Marijuana, on Residents of Pueblo County, Colorado," comes from Colorado State University-Pueblo's Institute of Cannabis Research (ICR), an interdisciplinary program established last year. The primary author, sociology professor and Tim McGettigan, worked closely with 30 other PhDs and Pueblo County officials to compile data on the area's homeless population.
    The study's conclusion: "Apart from anecdotal reports, we did not find definitive evidence that links increased homelessness to legal cannabis." Rather, "the major factors leading to homelessness are a lack of affordable housing, inability to find work, and family crises."
    (https://merryjane.Com/news/does-legal-weed-increase-homelessness-colorado-pueblo-march-2018)

  • Yes weed needs to be legal

    Here is my main reason people always go straight to stereotypes about weed and if weed was actually legal lots of those stereotypes would stop. There’s many worse drugs you can do, like cocaine and heroine and people would use those much anymore. If weed was legal. And there’s medical marijuana so why cant there be regular marijuana. Personally marijuana isn’t that bad it doesn’t do that bad of stuff to you. Weed should be legal it would be sold to people over the age of 21 and there still would b people underage using it but there always is when there’s a popular substance. Many people underage use cigarettes. There for i think weed should be legal

  • The drug war is bad..

    Pushing this underground creates a very dangerous situation.. Adulterated weed causes more harm than legal weed ever could.. I don't want my kid to smoke weed.. However I know he might try it.. I'd rather he try real pure weed than something called weed loaded with hairspray and stolen veterinarian pharmaceuticals..

  • It's mostly harmless

    I'm for legalisation and I have facts.
    1. Only about 9% of smokers become addicted.
    2. Heavy pot smokers are at risk for some of the same diseases as cigarette smokers, such as bronchitis and other respiratory ailments.
    3. Scientists have found that a marijuana compound can freeze and stop the spread of some types of aggressive cancer.
    4. Several studies indicate that both alcohol and smoking are more harmful than marijuana. Marijuana is also much less harmful than other “hard” drugs, such as cocaine and heroin.
    5. Someone would have to smoke over 1,500 pounds of marijuana within about 15 minutes to die of a lethal overdose. In other words, dying from a weed overdose is nearly impossible.

  • Yes it should and cigarettes should not

    Weed has never killed a person alone its the activities
    meanwhile cigarettes killed so many people every yearhttps://www.Promises.Com/resources/overdose/many-people-died-weed/
    this are my sources to prove my claim there you go
    why is this even an argument for the majority of us history weed was fully legal it was not until the probation

  • Yes if alcohol and cigarettes why not weed.

    Mexico was never as good as america. Legalizing weed lets people purchase from non-shady people. Communism ruined Latin America not drugs. I have never nor will do drugs recreational but the government should not have the right to control it. The drug war has only harmed america, heroin is cheaper than ever before.

  • I don't want that crap anywhere.

    It is legal where I live, and it has visibly increased the homeless population and contributed to a heroin problem. We should also crack down on tobacco.

    Both weed and tobacco should be illegal to sell, and addicts given addiction specific mental health help. Dealers should be held accountable for the deaths they have caused.

    Weed stinks, quite badly. Somehow worse than cigarettes. Lets stop companies from gaining off of self created mental illness.

    Weed is a psychedelic drug that can cause in some people permanent damage to mental health.

    Let's stop being a society of enablers.

  • Mexico legalized weed and look where they are

    In many Latin American countries, weed is legal there. 1/3 of drug cartel's business is selling weed; that's a plurality. In part due of the drug cartels, Latin America is a messed up place and it is causing many refugees to flee to countries that are not messed up.

    Alec Stanton

    Posted by: asta
  • It's a gateway drug.

    "A study published in the International Journal of Drug Policy found that nearly 45 percent of regular marijuana smokers used another illicit drug later in life. In fact, marijuana users are three times more likely than nonusers to abuse heroin, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention."
    "Teens who reported heavy marijuana use in the past month were:
    30 times more likely to use crack cocaine.
    20 times more likely to use ecstasy.
    15 times more likely to abuse prescription painkillers.
    14 times more likely to abuse over-the-counter medications." (1)

    According to the Bureau of Justice, marijuana is sold along side other hard drugs by the drug cartels. (2) Basically, they get you hooked on softer drugs to get your business for harder drugs. Tho making it legal in some states has decreased the amount of marijuana that drug cartels send here, it actually does them a favor. Why make a little profit selling a drug to get them started when a local street merchant can do it for you. Now the drug cartels can focus more on the more profitable hardcore drugs. Basically, making it legal just maximizes the profits for the drug cartels.

    1) https://www.drugrehab.com/guides/gateway-drugs/
    2) https://www.bjs.gov/content/dcf/enforce.cfm#seizures

  • Not for recreational use

    Although I agree for medical use of cannabis, I disagree on recreational use. Cannabis is very effective for pain relief, and if ingested it does just pass through the body, and it's not as toxic as cigarettes and alcohol, which those two things are legalized. But it does cause dizziness and other side effects.

    I think that in a medical setting, it could be helpful to alleviate certain symptoms, but I suppose since I am sensitive to smoke, I guess I'd not like to see it everywhere.


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