Shows like 'Intervention' coerce addicts to seek help, but are alcohol and drug rehabs substantially effective if the addicts didn't decide to go on their own?

Shows like 'Intervention' coerce addicts to seek help, but are alcohol and drug rehabs substantially effective if the addicts didn't decide to go on their own?
  • It does not matter why they went, so long as they go, because that can be a first step towards recovery.

    Some people just need that extra push to go to rehab. To say that just because a show incited them to go, that is why they will fail in the rehab, is just an excuse. The real problem is the factors of why they are using the drug in the first place. A large amount of users use it because they do not have any other form of entertainment. They do not feel comfortable in social settings, because of the drug use, so they just stay home and use.

    Posted by: 5c0tJung
  • I agree that if an addict does not seek help of his own free will he won't stay sober because he isn't really ready to quit.

    Drug and alcohol addiction is a tricky condition. There is a psychology at work that has to run a certain course before an addict can commit to treatment. He may go into treatment because he knows that eventually it's either that, or die. But if he is being shoved into it and the decision hasn't been made after he's hit rock bottom and come to the conclusion he needs help on his own, the odds he will maintain sobriety are very slim.

    Posted by: N3vinFace
  • A person's initial choice to seek treatment doesn't guarantee success, and people can find motivation through their experience and reflection during treatment they did not initiate.

    It's better for a person suffering addiction to seek treatment rather than be coerced into it--morally and in terms of the likelihood of success. But it seems reductive to state categorically that a person who proactively enters treatment with good intentions will necessarily succeed at any given attempt, or that a person who begins unwillingly will always fail. Motivation is too complex and layered for such generalizations. The treatment approach, one's reflection about her condition, one's history, the support one receives--all these factors also contribute to the outcome. Yet unless a person has committed a crime or is incompetent to manage her own decisions, treatment ought to be voluntary. People have the right to come to terms with their lives in their own way and time. Making one's own decisions rather than simply outwardly conforming can actually facilitate treatment--which isn't to deny that accepting advice can also be important.

    Posted by: M4I4cFeIine
  • Yes, all rehabs will help addicts eventually even if they did not want to go on their own. There is always a chance that they will see what mistake they are making and that will make them want to reform.

    Even if an addict was dragged into a rehab unwillingly, being in rehab may always bring about a change in his views. He may see that people like him are also trying to reform their lives and it may encourage him to stay away from his addictions too. It's always worth a try.

    Posted by: danoneeno
  • I believe that forcing some people into rehab can save their lives.

    I have experienced having to force someone that is very close to me into a rehab center. This person is now done with that addiction and I am grateful that she is still alive. Without my force, I believe she would have died.

    Posted by: dbchat
  • Force does not equal will

    Forcing anyone to do anything they don't will for themselves, even if it's for their own good will never work in the long term. Faced with confrontation most people submit externally but if they don't have the true will and desire to become drug free for themselves it creates distrust and almost guaranteed relapse and ultimately removes the addicts support system from them. It is human nature, pure and simple. You can take the reverse and see when a person has made the choice themselves and seek the help and support of friends and family the success rate skyrockets. I feel shows like intervention do more harm than good. It further stigmatizes the addict which creates tremendous fear and shame. I've seen the show several times and the way in which they portray the addicts is in the worst light possible and preys on the public's ignorance about addiction and lumps all addiction and addicts together, making the addict look villainous, when they are human beings that are ill and hurting. These are very negative principles to found a positive outcome on. From what I have seen of the show it seems that the majority of forced rehab people they have had on the show have relapsed which further harms addicts and the public at large. Addicts are human beings and come from all walks of life, each individual with their own unique experiences. Most rehabs are based on the AA model and one size doesn't fit all. We need to remove the shame and fear and look upon addiction as a medical issue rather than a moral one and treat the whole person, not just the addiction.

  • Nope

    You have to want to quit to be able to quit. Being forced to quit drugs wont do me. Yeah, it might help while you are in drug rehab because one, you have no choice, two, you are around sober people, three, it's a lot easier having the support you need. But being in rehab is 110% different than being in the real world. You have way more temptations in the real world than you do while in rehab. You have the freedom to do anything you want. In rehab they say you have to change your "People, Places, and Things." How are you supposed to ignore people that live in your town? How are you supposed to change where you live? It costs money to move, not everyone has money. Things? Things can be everywhere. It could be a song, a smell, a TV could be anything that leads you back to your addiction. It's not easy, and will always have those drugs (and yes, alcohol is a drug) waiting for you. Like I said, you have to want to quit to be able to quit.

  • From personal experience

    If you are forced into a treatment center and expected to follow the rules then whoever put you there is about to learn different. When I was fourteen, I needed help but I didn't want it. I could have done just as good maybe even better if they would have just paired me with a personal counselor, but they decided to put me in a treatment center in Portland. Even though they thought it might help, it actually made it a lot worse, for multiple reasons. They had basically decided to put me in a familiar drug use environment where I could find more dealers and more hookups on the outs. Another reason, there was so much drama and people beating people up that there was no way you could focus on yourself and your treatment. You just had to get out and do it fast before someone got mad enough to get their friends on the outs to beat you up too. So the people who are saying yes on the other side obviously haven't been through what we've been through. You can't tell it till youv'e dealt with it so...

  • Rehab is ineffective with those who don't want to change.

    Alcoholics Anonymous is the founding program that started addiction rehabilitation, and the first of their famous twelve steps is that the addict must admit that they have a problem. If they are unable to do that, then they can't get off any drug, because they are still mentally drunk on the idea that their addiction is okay.

    Posted by: FlakyHerb64
  • People should be encouraged to go to rehabilitation if they have an addiction.

    Whether or not someone is coerced to go into rehabilitation does not always indicate if they actually quit in the long run. If they are using drugs, they may need to get clean in order to make better decisions for themselves. Now, if they were clean at the time of the intervention and were forced to go is another matter altogether. They probably will not do so well in rehabilitation.

    Posted by: Nich0HeIPfuI
  • The rate of recovery from forced interventions is much lower than for voluntary interventions.

    The Russians tried for decades to imprison and punish alcoholics. It didn't work, for the most part. Fear was not sufficient motivation for patients to quit drinking and stay that way. Voluntary patients, however, have an interest in their recovery. They go into the situation wanting to be helped. If they want to recover, their odds are vastly improved.

    Posted by: SixCristobal
  • Ni, I disagree that rehab is effective if a person didn't decide to go on their own because if they wanted to stop drug use, they would have done so or at least tried without the help of a show.

    I disagree that rehab is effective for people that didn't decide to go on their own, because if they had wanted to stop they obviously would have entered rehab willingly before it took a show or rehab center being involved with their personal life. If they wanted to stop using drugs, they would have done something about it and sought treatment, not continued down the path of destruction. You have to be ready; no one else can make this type of decision for you, no matter how badly they want to help you.

    Posted by: I33Iess
  • I do not believe forced alcohol and drug rehab centers are effective at stopping a person's addiction, if the person is not committed enough to go on their own.

    When a person does not voluntarily decide to enter alcohol or drug rehab, they do not fully commit to the idea of becoming sober. Only when a person is truly and personally committed to kicking a drug or alcohol problem will a life free from addiction be obtainable. I am sure, in rare cases, a person who was not fully willing to do a rehab program comes around and does end up sober, once fully immersed in the program.

    Posted by: TickoCa22
  • No, rehabs are not very effective if the addicts did not decide to go into rehab on their own, because without making the decision to get better, a junkie will just go straight back to whatever they are addicted to.

    Drug and alcohol addiction is a mental issue, more than it is a physical one. If an addict does not make the decision to even try to get better on their own, rehab is worthless. Even if they make it through the full program, they have no one but themselves to stop them from taking drugs again, once they are out of rehab. Like they say in most support groups, the first step to getting better is admitting that you have a problem, and forcing someone into rehab skips that step.

    Posted by: H_Baird
  • Addicts that are coerced into rehab do not have effective treatment.

    An intervention may help an individual realize that they have a problem, but they are not ready to get better if they are forced to go into rehab. I think in some cases an intervention may be a good wake-up call, but rehab is not effective unless the addict is willing to admit that there is a problem and is ready to get better. Otherwise, as you can see on other shows on TV, many addicts end up in rehab again.

    Posted by: EImerN4th

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