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Suspension of Stephen A. Smith: Does the physicality of a contact sport translate into players' personal lives?

  • The physicality of a contact sport translates into players' personal lives.

    The physicality of a contact sport translates into players' personal lives because they are taught that aggression is okay and normal. Since most pro-athletes are men, they are especially vulnerable to those encouragements about aggression. Character traits usually affect a person's whole life and do not get compartmentalized easily into one aspect of life.

  • I think it has to

    Yes, the physicality of a contact sport translates into players personal lives. These are people who have dedicated their lives to their sport and live it every day. It is who they are and it makes sense that it would be as much a part of their private life as it is their professional life.

  • No, physicality of a contact sport doesn't translate into a player's personal life.

    Physicality of a contact sport doesn't translate into a player's personal life. The player understands that the sport is just a competition or a job and as a result the only people they come into contact with are opponents. The sport is not a very traumatic experience and as a result there will be no chance of PTSD. The only way physicality could translate into a player's personal life is using it as a lie to cover up the real motive.

  • No, it stems from a mentality developed from a young age.

    A lot of people play contact sports but don't engage in violent domestic altercations. The type of behavior that resulted in the football player's suspension starts with a mindset that such behavior is justified in some cases. This subconscious thinking comes as a result of modeling behavior or in effective training on personal conduct.


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