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The Marine Corps have a new training regime that is meant to emphasize gender-neutral standards for combat jobs. Do you think this is appropriate?

The Marine Corps have a new training regime that is meant to emphasize gender-neutral standards for combat jobs. Do you think this is appropriate?
  • Yes, it is appropriate to emphasize gender-neutral standards

    Now that women are allowed to be deployed in combat situations, it is important to remove gender bias from the equation. With gender bias playing a role in how Marines are treated in such an intense situation, it could put people at risk. It is also important that every member of the Marine Corps is trained in the same way and held to the same standards so as to establish a sense of camaraderie. If either gender feels the other is getting special treatment, it could result in conflicts within the organization.

  • They are soldiers.

    There are differences between men and women but women are just as capable of doing anything a man can. If we keep it gender neutral then we get rid of that mentality that men will want to protect women in battle and it will cloud their judgment in a life or death situation.

  • No, we don't have equal world but we have to somehow make it equal

    Well, that sounds quite sexist. I never understood these people who push for "equality" and then go ahead and make it unequal. Having quotas is despicable and yet is everywhere in the West. The whole far-left movement is that everyone is equal, and yet they make quotas so that people (disregarding race, gender, etc.) who do not qualify to get in solely because they force the idea of "equality" by making things unequal?

  • No it is not

    The Marine Corps’ new training regime, meant to emphasize gender-neutral standards for combat jobs, has weeded out 40 male recruits and all but one female recruit since the standards were put in place at the beginning of the year, according to documents obtained by The Washington Post.
    Of the roughly 1,500 recruits vying for combat jobs between Jan. 1 and May 20, only seven of them were women. The six women and 40 men who failed were reassigned to noncombat jobs, according to the documents.


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