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  • Sfsfsdf s df as fsdf

    Depends what way you look at it. The confederates supported Racism and the flag supported them, so in a way the flag supported racism or represented it btut whoe cares it's a freaking flag. Blah sd f sdf sd fs df asd f asd fas df asd f sad f dsfa f s

  • Sfsfsdf s df as fsdf

    Depends what way you look at it. The confederates supported Racism and the flag supported them, so in a way the flag supported racism or represented it btut whoe cares it's a freaking flag. Blah sd f sdf sd fs df asd f asd fas df asd f sad f dsfa f s

  • A symbol used by different type of people

    The Battle Flag was used by Southern States that felt the Government was oppressing them.
    Afterwards it used as by hate groups and by Southern Patriots. Sometime some southerner might belong to both groups.
    Since my Grandfather arrive in the US in 1928 from Sweden, I have no true connection with the Civil War legacy that many people still have.
    I would ask the Flag Bearer a question? What does this Flag represent to you? If the person's answer is one of patriotism due to a family history during the civil war ... Then it's being used as a patriotic symbol. If they state my family has been KKK clan member since birth .. Then it is being used as a racist symbol.
    If someone sees the battle flag as a purely racist symbol ...Then don't own one.
    It a symbol can have multiple meanings, then everyone should take that into consideration. The actual actions of said flag bearer would be a clear indicator also.

    I personally don't see the battle flag, itself, as a racist flag.
    How do people feel about the swastika? Even though it's history is much older then the Nazi party itself.
    It is considered to be a sacred and auspicious symbol in Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism and dates back to before 2nd century B.C.

    Symbol throughout time has been highly stigmatized by evil groups of people.
    I believe it is the intention and belief of the symbol bearer than the symbol itself.

    As I've stated in my background, if I truly liked the design of the swastika or the Battle Flag. I would be either viewed as a racist or a patriot without be either. It just flag that has different meanings to different people.
    If someone was being forced or required to carry or display the symbol that is against your feelings towards the symbol that is another issue.
    In the past decade or two I haven't heard of anyone in that position.

  • This is part of our history

    The thing is the "rebel" flag isn't racist its part of our history. Some people might say that it's racist but it's a flag.

    One thing you could compare this to is the nazis during world war 2. We're try racist? That by opinion because most of Germany during that time grew up like that. Not knowing anything else

    And lastly, if it's such a problem, then we should Learn from our mistakes

  • It's Just Southern Pride

    Of all the people I've met who've flied the Confederate flag, none are racist they are simply proud to be Southern. The problem is that only evil Confederates like Dylan Roof get featured on the news, never does the news cover anybody who flies the flag out of Southern pride.

    And anyone who is about to say "Oh, the Civil War was a war against Southern slavery." need a history lesson. The South wasn't fighting for slavery, they were fighting because they didn't like the government, and the North wasn't fighting to end slavery, they were fighting to restore the Union. If the South was fighting for nothing more than slavery, then why did black men join their army?

    For God sake's, Robert E. Lee was against slavery. He once called it "A moral and political evil."

  • It is history.

    The Confederacy was not created for the sole purpose of keeping slaves, nor did everyone who called themselves a citizen of the Confederacy own slaves. In fact, some Confederates were even against it. I need 17 more words in my argument and these are the ones that I will choose.


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