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TSA scrambling resources: Should TSA employ more security measures to ensure passengers' safety?

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  • No, they are inept at what they do now!

    No, they should not employ more security measures. The agency cannot even perform the duties they do now properly, why would additional tasks be any better? We need to stop being afraid of shadows and stop allowing ourselves to be treated like cattle by those who happen to work for a government agency.

  • No, TSA should not employ more security measures to ensure passengers' safety.

    No, TSA does not need more security measures to ensure passengers' safety, but rather, different security measures. There has been some discussion of pre-assessment and vetting for low-risk, frequent travelers that could reduce congestion at airport security checkpoints. Avoiding random pat-downs and tests for explosive residue on hands of low-risk passengers, for example, would leave security agents free to focus on other individuals.

  • The TSA does not need to employ more security measures to ensure passengers' safety

    The TSA does not need to employ more security measures to ensure passengers' safety. When I hear the words "employ more security measures," what I really hear is "more money." The TSA already has a significant budget. Instead of focusing on more measures, the agency must perfect those already in place and get better at what it is already supposed to do.

  • No, security has gone far enough already

    Security measures as they currently stand are more stringent than they've ever been, and in reality if you consider security on a long-term, global scale we are far safer than we have ever been. There are still a small number of high-profile attacks that generate headlines and induce fear but realistically people are more protected and suffer more security checks than ever before. It will never be possible to stop all terrorist attacks and at some point we have to consider the economics of more security versus the freedom of movement of the individual.


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